Florida judge denies motion to throw out MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis

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There was plenty of skepticism when MLB filed a lawsuit against Biogenesis and Anthony Bosch earlier this year, but they scored an important victory earlier today. Julie K. Brown of the Miami Herald has the story:

After pondering such thorny issues as stale cookies and a Major League baseball player who used the alias “Al Capone” to buy performance enhancing drugs, a Miami-Dade Circuit Court judge denied a motion to toss out the sport’s civil lawsuit against Biogenesis, the South Florida doping pipeline to baseball players and other professional athletes — as well as collegiate and high school players.

Monday’s decision, by Judge Ronald Dresnick, means that Major League Baseball can use the legal system to force witnesses to give depositions that may substantiate Biogenesis founder Tony Bosch’s story that his clinic supplied banned substances to high-profile major leaguers for many years.

MLB sued Biogenesis, Anthony Bosch, and other associates back in March, alleging that they interfered with players’ contracts by giving them performance-enhancing drugs. Bosch has since agreed to cooperate with MLB’s investigation. In return, he’ll be dropped from the lawsuit and receive help with his legal fees.

Those subpoenaed by MLB include former University of Miami pitching coach Lazaro Collazo, who is accused of acting as a middleman for the clinic. While he isn’t a part of MLB’s lawsuit against Biogenesis, he was among those arguing for its dismissal today. However, Dresnick’s ruling means that he could now be forced to talk under oath about what he knows. Alex Rodriguez’s cousin, Yuri Sucart, was also issued a subpoena by MLB.

Matt Carpenter hit a standup bunt double

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The wave of defensive shifts we’ve seen over the past few years has led to a lot of armchair hitting coaches demanding that players bunt to beat it. This is easier said than done, however.

The shift happens because certain hitters tend to pull the ball. Certain hitters tend to pull the ball because pulling the ball is what happens when one gets a strong, quick swing on a pitch one identifies early and which one endeavors to send as far away from home plate as possible. Which is to say that pulling is a skill that is good to have and which is strongly selected for among hitters.

In light of that, “why not just bunt to beat the shift” takes are kind of lazy. Bunting is hard! And it is not a thing guys who get shifted a lot are good at. Most of the time asking a player to do a thing he is not well-equipped to do is a bad idea. Indeed, a hitter voluntarily going away from his strength is something the defense would much prefer.

Most of the time anyway.

Last night Matt Carpenter made those armchair hitting coaches happy by laying down a bunt to beat the shift. And he laid it down so well that he ended up with a standup double:

One batter later Carpenter scored on a Starlin Castro error.

The shift giveth and the shift taketh away.