Yasiel Puig ends pitcher’s duel with walk-off homer

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Rumors of Yasiel Puig’s demise were greatly exaggerated. After lighting the baseball world on fire following his debut on June 3, Puig went into a skid, posting a .579 OPS in 16 games between July 3-23. The thought was that the league had finally caught up to him, but entering this afternoon’s series finale against the Reds, Puig had logged multiple hits in four of his previous five games and brought his OPS back up to .999.

Reds starter Tony Cingrani was magnificent, shutting the Dodgers out over seven innings of work, allowing one hit and one walk while striking out 11. As ESPN Stats & Info pointed out, it was the first time a Reds starter had gone seven, struck out at least 11, and allowed no more than one hit and one walk since Johnny Vander Meer in 1941. Not bad. However, Dodgers starter Chris Capuano was up to the task of matching Cingrani, shutting the Reds out over six and two-thirds innings. He allowed just three hits, walked none, and struck out four.

Both bullpens continued the scoreless affair into the bottom of the eleventh, when the Reds called upon 26-year-old rookie Curtis Partch. The right-hander quickly got two outs, retiring Elian Herrera on strikes (the Dodgers’ 20th of the game, a team record) and Mark Ellis on an infield pop-up, bringing up Puig who was 0-for-3 with three strikeouts and a walk to that point. On the second pitch of the at-bat, Puig drove Partch’s offering well beyond the fence in left field for the walk-off solo home run. Puig knew it was gone on contact, happily flipping his bat. After circling the bases, he slid into home plate as his teammates crowded around him.

.gifs courtesy @ChadMoriyama.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.