Marlins hitting coach Tino Martinez resigns amid allegations that he was abusive to players

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UPDATE, 4:07 p.m. ET: Well that didn’t take long. Spencer reports that Martinez has resigned from the Marlins.

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You can understand how a hitting coach might be upset with a team that has registered a collective .233/.292/.337 batting line. But this is — at any level of baseball — taking it too far:

Marlins hitting coach Tino Martinez was poised to resign after a player notified the team Martinez erupted in anger unjustly and grabbed him by his neck and neck chain, according to multiple sources.

But sources said team owner Jeffrey Loria, who made the decision to hire Martinez, nixed the idea, at least for now.

That story comes from the Miami Herald‘s Clark Spencer, who has identified the victim in that particular incident as second baseman Derek Dietrich. Spencer heard from an unnamed Marlins player that Martinez has also been either physically or verbally abusive this year to outfielder Justin Ruggiano, veteran infielder Chris Valaika and minor-league infielder Matt Downs.

Martinez, 45, had never coached at the MLB level prior to this year. He was a hand-picked hire by Loria.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.