And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

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Rays 5, Red Sox 1: David Price tossed a one-run, five hit complete game, with a solo homer by Mike Napoli the only real blemish. He needed a mere 97 pitches. That’s what happens when you throw 72 strikes. The Sox and Rays are once again tied in the loss column.

Dodgers 8, Blue Jays 3: For the second day in a row a team scores a boatload of runs in the tenth inning. We should probably come up with a name for that. I’m sure the Germans have a name for it with multiple syllables already because they’re so good at that. I’m thinking the word “shambles” has to be in it. Like “Exrasshambles” or something. Anyway, the Dodgers are apparently indestructible these days.

Pirates 4, Nationals 2: The “Kill the Win” alarm was buzzing loudly at Brian Kenny’s house last night as Stephen Strasburg tossed eight two-hit innings with 12 strikeouts and took the loss. That’s what happens, though, when one of those hits you allow is a solo homer and your opponent — Francisco Liranio — tosses shutout ball into the eighth. Drew Storen has been a hot mess for the Nats all year. The Nats haven’t won a game since the break and, my picking them as a team that could make a move in the second half notwithstanding, are now nine freakin’ games back.

Athletics 4, Astros 3: The A’s take their 11th of 12 games so far this year against Houston, this on a come from behind job powered by a Coco Crisp two-run homer. Someone asked Crisp after the game if the A’s offense relies too much on homers. The idea that a team hits too many homers always makes me chuckle. It’s like asking someone if they’re too rich or too thin.

Braves 8, Mets 2: A win, yes, but an awful loss in the form of Tim Hudson’s freak fractured ankle that will put him out for the season. Don’t seek out the video of this one, folks. It’s Tim Krumrie stuff.

Angels 1, Twins 0: Jered Weaver: 8 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 9K. Pretty much says it all.

Brewers 3, Padres 1: Kyle Lohse with a strong outing. He’s quietly been pretty great for the Brewers lately, going 6-1 with a 2.51 ERA over his past 11 starts. The Brewers should probably try to flip him.

Indians 10, Mariners 1: Down goes the Mariners win streak. Scott Kazmir tossed one-hit ball for eight innings, allowing nothin’ but an unearned run. Michael Bourn hit a grand slam. Asdrubal Cabrera homered and drove in three. Eleven runs scored in this game and it lasted a mere six minutes more than the 1-0 Angels-Twins game.

Cardinals 11, Phillies 3: Another day Ruben Amaro is reported to still be a buyer at the deadline, another day the Phillies get thumped. Sixteen hits for the Cardinals.

Rockies 2, Marlins 1: Yet another nice pitching performance last night. This one from Jorge De La Rosa, who tossed six scoreless. Colorado can force a 2-2 tie in what I like to think of as the 1993 Expansion Series if they win today.

Cubs 7, Diamondbacks 6: Chicago had a 6-0 lead, blew it, but then Nate Schierholtz — who had five RBI overall — drove in the go-ahead run in the 12th. Basically any team could’ve had Schierholtz before the season began. No one wanted him but the Cubs. He’s hitting .277/.334/.521. How’s your team’s right fielder doin’?

Rangers 3, Yankees 1: Matt Garza makes his Texas debut and allowed only one unearned run in seven and a third. Homers from A.J. Pierzynski and David Murphy.

Reds 8, Giants 3: Mike Leake somehow survived six innings of one-run ball despite allowing 12 hits. He also went 3 for 4 and scored a run. Joey Votto, Brandon Phillips and Devin Mesoraco each drove in two. The Reds finish their season series with the Giants having taken six of seven. I suppose that doesn’t totally make up for last year’s playoffs, but it’s something.

Tigers 6, White Sox 2: Anibal Sanchez joins the parade of great starting pitching performances last night, tossing six scoreless. Prince Fielder, Austin Jackson and Torii Hunter homered.

Royals 4, Orioles 3: Two homers for Eric Hosmer. More like Eric Homer, amirite?  God, I don’t know why I keep doing that. More coffee please.  Good morning everyone.

Bellinger, Puig power Game 7 win to send Dodgers to the World Series

Yasiel Puig
AP Images
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The Dodgers are headed back to the World Series following a 5-1 win over the Brewers during Game 7 of the NLCS. Cody Bellinger delivered the go-ahead shot after taking Jhoulys Chacín deep in the second inning, and Yasiel Puig‘s three-run blast in the sixth helped bolster the Dodgers’ lead as they wrapped up their second consecutive NL pennant.

The Brewers looked dominant from the get-go. Jhoulys Chacín set down a scoreless first inning while Christian Yelich proved he was capable of harnessing the power that nearly won him the Triple Crown during the regular season. He smashed an 0-1 pitch from rookie right-hander Walker Buehler in the bottom of the first, sending it out to center field to mark his first home run since Game 1 of the NLDS.

It wasn’t long before the cracks began to show, however. Cody Bellinger returned with a two-run shot in the second inning, and another double from Puig signaled the end of Chacín’s outing. He used just six pitches to get through all three outs in the second, then handed the ball to southpaw Josh Hader to start the third. The lefty didn’t disappoint. After sitting out of Game 6, he pitched a flawless three innings to keep the Brewers on the Dodgers’ tail, issuing just one hit, one walk, and four strikeouts until he made his exit in the sixth.

Had the Brewers been able to rely on Hader for a longer outing, they might have chosen to do so. Instead, Xavier Cedeño and Jeremy Jeffress combined for a disastrous outing in the sixth, first with back-to-back singles from Max Muncy and Justin Turner, then with a three-RBI homer from Puig that allowed Los Angeles to pull ahead with a four-run lead.

The Dodgers did their fair share of shutting down the Brewers at the plate, too. In the bottom of the fifth, Milwaukee verged on a tie after Lorenzo Cain drove a two-out, line drive double into left field. Julio Urias replaced Walker as Yelich came back up to the plate, but any thought of a go-ahead homer was quickly shut down as Chris Taylor sprinted to make a jaw-dropping, over-the-shoulder catch at the warning track.

The bats settled down from the sixth inning on — neither the Dodgers nor the Brewers found an opening against Milwaukee’s Corey Knebel and Brandon Woodruff and L.A.’s Kenley Jansen and Clayton Kershaw, respectively. Woodruff struck out the side in the eighth, while Jansen refused to allow a single batter to reach base in 1 1/3 innings of work. Things appeared to shift back in the Dodgers’ favor in the ninth, as Puig and Taylor collected a single and double and Woodruff loaded the bases after intentionally walking Matt Kemp to get to Enrique Hernández. That feeling was short-lived, though, as Woodruff decimated Hernández and Muncy in back-to-back strikeouts to cap the inning.

With a World Series berth on the line, not to mention the club’s 23rd NL pennant, the Dodgers weren’t taking any chances when the bottom of the ninth rolled around. Up 5-1 with three outs remaining, Clayton Kershaw stepped on the mound for the first time since his Game 5 win. He looked just as dominant in relief, retiring Shaw on a groundout, inducing a six-pitch strikeout from Jesús Aguilar, and effectively dashing the Brewers’ World Series hopes as Mike Moustakas struck out swinging for the third and final out of the game.

Game 1 of the World Series is set for Tuesday, October 23 at 8:09 PM EDT, when left-hander Chris Sale will take the mound for the Red Sox at Fenway Park. The Dodgers’ starter has yet to be formally announced. The Red Sox are currently looking for their ninth championship title, while the Dodgers are on the cusp of their seventh.