Joe Mauer leaves the Twins for the birth of his twins

22 Comments

Joe Mauer was a last-minute scratch from last night’s lineup, leaving the Twins in California and flying back home to Minnesota because his wife went into labor with twins.

Her due date was August 31, but twins often arrive a lot earlier than expected and Mauer will miss at least a few games while on paternity leave. There wasn’t enough time to add another player to the roster for last night’s game, but Chris Herrmann started in Mauer’s place at catcher and ended up hitting a grand slam in the 10th inning to seal a victory over the Angels.

Drew Butera is on a cross-country flight from Rochester, New York to Anaheim, California to join the Twins for tonight’s game. And here in Minnesota there’s a different Royal Baby watch going on.

UPDATE: Twins baseball communications director Dustin Morse just announced that Maddie Mauer gave birth to twin girls named Emily and Maren early this morning. Joe made it back just in time.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
4 Comments

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.