Report: Dodgers sign Cuban infielder Alexander Guerrero for $32 million

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Update: Guerrero’s agent has denied that there’s an agreement in place, according to MLB.com’s Jesse Sanchez. He says there are still three teams in the mix.

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Cuban shortstop Alexander Guerrero, who defected and set up shop in the Dominican Republic back in January, has inked a seven-year, $32 million contract with the Dodgers, according to ESPN Desportes’ Dionisio Soldevila.

Before sitting out the 2012-13 season, Guerrero was one of Cuba’s best players and it’s best offensive middle infielder. He hit .338/.408/.641 in 2009, .343/.414/.583 in 2010 and .310/.400/.599 in 2011, amassing a total of 60 homers in 886 at-bats between the three seasons. His numbers aren’t quite up to par with what Jose Abreu, Alfredo Despaigne, Yulieski Gourriel and Frederich Cepeda have done in the Cuba, but they’re a match for those that Yoenis Cespedes put up before defecting.

Guerrero probably won’t hit for quite the same kind of power in the larger ballparks of the U.S., and his numbers defensively at shortstop were nothing special. A move to second base may have been needed anyway, and reports are already suggesting that the Dodgers are looking at him as a long-term replacement for Mark Ellis in the lineup. Since he hasn’t played lately, he’ll begin his Dodgers career in the minors. However, if he finds his swing in a hurry, he could contribute this year.

Astros assistant GM Mike Elias reported to be next Orioles general manager

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Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that Astros assistant GM Mike Elias will be the new general manager of the Orioles “barring a change of heart.”

Elias, 35, has been the Astros’ assistant general manager since August 2016. He had previously served as Houston’s scouting director and, before that, as a scout for the Cardinals. He was part of the team that came over from the Cardinals when Jeff Luhnow joined the Astros.

If he does take the O’s job his work will certainly be cut out for him. Baltimore was historically bad in 2018, finishing 47-115 thanks to a roster full of expensive, past-their-prime players and an underdeveloped farm system. He’ll have to hit the ground running too, as he’ll not join the team until nearly two months into the club’s offseason, having had no time to assess its needs and personnel. Oh, and the Winter Meetings begin in a little over three weeks.