Report: Evidence against A-Rod goes “far beyond” what was found on Ryan Braun

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With the baseball world still reeling from the news of Ryan Braun’s suspension for his connection to Biogenesis, many are naturally wondering what is in store for Alex Rodriguez. Well, if what ESPN’s T.J. Quinn is hearing is accurate, it doesn’t bode well for him.

Quinn also writes that “MLB confronted Braun with volumes of evidence provided by Tony Bosch, including texts.” What evidence MLB has against Rodriguez isn’t exactly clear, but that there was enough there for Braun to make a deal is not promising. It also could hurt the possibility of a successful appeal, as Braun’s actions today give Bosch credibility, which is something that has been in question since the Biogenesis investigation began. For what it’s worth, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reported earlier today that MLB received “receipts, checks, the whole nine yards” during their investigation, though it’s not known whether any of those apply to Rodriguez.

Interestingly, Quinn writes that the case against Rodriguez includes the possibility that he interfered with the investigation, so MLB is expected to go after him harder than they did Braun. Bill Madden and Teri Thompson of the New York Daily News reported last weekend that lawyers for Rodriguez were internally discussing the possibility of a plea agreement with MLB — possibly settling on a 150-game suspension — though he and his representatives have denied the story.

Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

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The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?