MLB commends Ryan Braun for taking responsibility. Which, OK. I guess he partially did.

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Ryan Braun and Major League Baseball have both issued statements in light of this afternoon’s bombshell suspension. First Braun:

“As I have acknowledged in the past, I am not perfect.  I realize now that I have made some mistakes.  I am willing to accept the consequences of those actions.  This situation has taken a toll on me and my entire family, and it is has been a distraction to my teammates and the Brewers organization.  I am very grateful for the support I have received from players, ownership and the fans in Milwaukee and around the country.  Finally, I wish to apologize to anyone I may have disappointed – all of the baseball fans especially those in Milwaukee, the great Brewers organization, and my teammates.  I am glad to have this matter behind me once and for all, and I cannot wait to get back to the game I love.”

That’s nice. Although it doesn’t account for the statements he made last year in which he impugned the integrity — however obliquely — of the MLB contractor who was responsible for shipping his sample. Nor has he acknowledged that he lied in his public statements regarding the nature of his relationship with Anthony Bosch earlier this year when he said his legal team used him as a consultant.

But MLB seems willing to look past that and put the Braun chapter of this mess in the rear-view mirror:

“We commend Ryan Braun for taking responsibility for his past actions,” said Rob Manfred, Executive Vice President, Economics & League Affairs for Major League Baseball. “We all agree that it is in the best interests of the game to resolve this matter.  When Ryan returns, we look forward to him making positive contributions to Major League Baseball, both on and off the field.”

It seems that the evidence against Braun was pretty darn strong. And that Braun was one of the players Michael Weiner had in mind when he said last week that the MLBPA would be strongly counseling players against whom there was overwhelming evidence to not appeal.

The Nats want Trea Turner to attempt 75-80 stolen bases this year

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When it comes to cliche spring training stories, we talk a lot about “Best Shape of His Life.” Sometimes we talk about the “[Pitcher] has been working on a changeup” or “[Hitter] has made an adjustment to his swing” stories too. Then there’s the “we’re really going to focus on fundamentals” quotes managers love to give in February and March. They’re evergreens. 

Another one in that category is the “we’re going to run more” or “we plan to be aggressive on the base paths this year.” You hear that from at least one or two managers every spring. I imagine because, like the fundamentals one, it deals with something over which they have at least some moderate control. It’s a good quote.

We’re hearing it from Nats training camp this year with respect to one particularly speedy player in Trea Turner. From Mark Zuckerman at MASN:

Davey Martinez called Trea Turner into his office this week and told the speedy shortstop he wants him to attempt more stolen bases this season. How many? Let’s just say even the ultra-aggressive Turner was taken aback.

“Yeah, he gave me a number,” Turner said. “And I was like: ‘Wow, all right.’”

Martinez later revealed to assembled reporters that he thinks if Turner “attempts 75-80, we’ll be in great shape.”

Turner led the National League with 43 stolen bases on 52 attempts in 2018. The year before he attempted 54, which was his career high. Only only four players have attempted 80 or more stolen bases in the past ten years, so yes, 75-80 would be quite the escalation.

Which is not to say it’s silly. On a very basic level, yeah, if he is stealing bases more often, even without changing his basic approach, the Nats WILL be in great shape because it’ll likely mean that he’s on base more, and that’s good. If it’s merely a matter of him being more aggressive in the same number of times on base, well, let me know, but I’m not holding my breath.

I guess it’s nice to have goals, though.