Heyman: “MLB has receipts, checks, the whole nine yards”

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Some interesting tidbits on the Biogenesis investigation from Jon Heyman. Among the things (I think anyway) we haven’t heard before: sources telling him that Major League Baseball has “receipts, checks, the whole nine yards.” I mean, it’s been safe to assume that, of course, but this is the first time I recall seeing a source tell a reporter that.

There’s also some stuff in there about A-Rod and his people being realistic about his impending suspension and the fact that, given his recent injury, he’s not likely to “beat the suspension to the field,” as they put it. Also interesting are reports of the league and the union’s possible differing interpretations of what constitutes multiple offenses, how much discipline might be doled out to players and whether any of them are willing to take pleas.

All of that makes a lot of sense. But this part about Alex Rodriguez doesn’t:

If MLB can possibly prove drug ties before and after his MLB interviews denying involvement, it’s possible he could get 150 games. While it would seem to be difficult to imagine a lifetime ban within one ruling, 150 games away could effectively end the career of a player with two bad hips who turns 38 on July 27.

The hips were good enough to have him hitting homers in rehab games until late last week’s quad injury. As for 150 games: if A-Rod got that handed to him tomorrow, and if he decided to just accept the suspension, he’d be eligible to come back at roughly this time next year. There are a lot of players — particularly pitchers — who miss a year and a half and make it back. Even old ones.

But maybe the better example here is Manny Ramirez. He’s older than A-Rod, has just as much if not more of a PED-taint than does A-Rod, was less effective than A-Rod was at the time of their last pre-suspension action, was probably in worse shape at the time of the suspensions, then retired and sat out for an extended period.  He jut signed with his third team since becoming a pariah.

Maybe A-Rod would just up and quit, but I kinda doubt it. And if didn’t quit, you can’t tell me a team wouldn’t take a chance on him as their DH at the very least. That team most likely being the Yankees themselves.

Kenley Jansen expected to be OK for spring training after heart procedure

Kenley Jansen
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Building on a report from early September, Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen is slated to undergo a heart procedure on November 26. The estimated recovery time ranges from two to eight weeks, according to comments Jansen made Friday, and he expects to be able to rejoin the team once spring training rolls around next year.

Jansen, 31, was first diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat in 2011 and missed significant time during the 2011, 2012, and 2018 seasons due to the condition. He underwent his first surgery to correct the irregularity in 2012, but suffered recurring symptoms that could not be treated long-term with the heart medication and blood thinners that had been prescribed to him. Scarier still was the “atrial fibrillation episode” that the reliever experienced during a road trip to Colorado in August; per MLB.com’s Ken Gurnick, the high altitude exacerbated his heart condition and left him susceptible to future episodes in the event that he chose to return to the Rockies’ Coors Field.

Heart issues notwithstanding, the veteran right-hander pitched through his third straight All-Star season in 2018. Overall, he saw a downward trend in most of his stats, but still collected 38 saves in 59 opportunities and finished the season with a respectable 3.01 ERA, 2.1 BB/9 and 10.3 SO/9 through 71 2/3 innings. In October, he helped carry the Dodgers to their second consecutive pennant and wrapped up his sixth postseason run with three saves, two blown saves, and a 1.69 ERA across 10 2/3 innings.