Death to Runners in Scoring Position Batting Averages

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Matt Snyder of CBS Sports.com addresses one of my biggest annoyances: announcers who spend tons of time talking about how the team they’re covering hits with runners in scoring position. Hit even harder: batting average with two outs and runners in scoring position. The target of his ire was Reds announcer Thom Brennaman, who mentioned this stat with respect to Joey Votto a lot. Read the column for some good stuff about how there’s a subtle — or sometimes not-so-subtle — criticism of player character and clutch-a-bility and all of that when it comes to RISP stats.

I get annoyed when hear this from announcers too. It’s right up there with their fetish for hitters which go the other way. You never hear about hitters who pull the ball with extreme effectiveness. You rarely hear about guys simply being great hitters, full stop.  That opposite-field hitting an RISP stuff is basically an announcer say “listen as I analyze the hell out of this game for you.”

Not that it’s entirely useless. It’s just misused. RISP numbers are things that actually happen in the world. And when used as an explanation for what happens in the past tense, fine, it does tell us that a team or player missed out on some opportunities. But it doesn’t have predictive value. It doesn’t speak to ability at all, actually. Just chance and stuff happening.  If the broadcaster can walk that fine line, great. But it’s so rare that they can.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.