Settling the Scores: Friday’s results

29 Comments

After two horrible days without any baseball and two sub-optimal days without baseball that counted we’re finally back to normal. Fifteen games last night and games every single day until the end of October at the very least. Ahhhhh.

What the heck got into the water in Houston? Brandon Barnes went 5 for 5 and hit for the cycle. An even better night: Mariners shortstop Brad Miller who hit two homers — a two-run job and a three run job — driving in five. And I’m willing to bet only seven people watched that game.

Which is totally cool. It’s seven more people enjoying baseball than could have on Wednesday or Thursday.

Mariners 10, Astros 7
Dodgers 3, Nationals 2
Rays 8, Blue Jays 5
Reds 5, Pirates 3
Red Sox 4, Yankees 2
Phillies 13, Mets 8
Orioles 3, Rangers 1
Brewers 2, Marlins 0
Braves 6, White Sox 4
Cardinals 9, Padres 6
Royals 1, Tigers 0
Cubs 3, Rockies 1
Twins 3, Indians 2
Giants 2, Diamondbacks 0
Angels 4, Athletics 1

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
3 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.