Erik Bedard allows no hits in 6.1 innings, loses anyway

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Astros lefty Erik Bedard brought a no-hitter into the seventh inning, but ran into a bit of trouble and a high pitch count. After Bedard walked Justin Smoak with one out (Bedard’s fifth walk of the evening), manager Bo Porter wasn’t willing to let him go beyond 111 pitches, replacing him with Jose Cisnero. Cisnero ran into a bit of trouble himself after recording the second out, walking Mike Zunino, then allowing the Mariners their first hit, a Michael Saunders two-run double that landed on Tal’s Hill.

Mariners starter Hisashi Iwakuma threw a scoreless seventh, Charlie Furbush tossed a scoreless eighth, and Tom Wilhelmsen nailed down the 4-2 victory in the ninth inning. Bedard becomes the ninth pitcher since 1901 to go at least six innings, allow no hits, and receive a loss. The last pitcher to do it was Jered Weaver in 2008 against the Dodgers.

Player Date Tm Opp Rslt App,Dec IP H R ER
Jered Weaver 2008-06-28 LAA LAD L 0-1 GS-6 ,L 6.0 0 1 0
Matt Young 1992-04-12 (1) BOS CLE L 1-2 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 2 2
Andy Hawkins 1990-07-01 NYY CHW L 0-4 CG 8 ,L 8.0 0 4 0
Don Wilson 1974-09-04 HOU CIN L 1-2 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 2 0
Clay Kirby 1970-07-21 SDP NYM L 0-3 GS-8 ,L 8.0 0 1 1
Steve Barber 1967-04-30 (1) BAL DET L 1-2 GS-9 ,L 8.2 0 2 1
Ken Johnson 1964-04-23 HOU CIN L 0-1 CG 9 ,L 9.0 0 1 0
Bob Shawkey 1917-07-04 (2) NYY WSH L 4-5 7.0 0 1 0
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/20/2013.

Also of note, Kyle Seager’s 15-game hitting streak came to an end, as did the Mariners’ streak of 23 consecutive games with a home run.

Nationals back off of minor league stipend cut

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Yesterday it was reported that the Washington Nationals would cut the weekly stipend paid to their minor leaguers from $400 a week to $300 per week through the end of June.

For frame of reference, MLB had agreed to pay all minor leaguers $400 per week through May 31. Several teams have agreed to extend that, with the Royals and Twins agreeing to do it all the way through the end of August. The Oakland A’s decided to stop the payments in their entirety as of today. The Nationals were unique in cutting $100 off of the checks.

The A’s and the Nationals have taken a great amount of flak for what they’ve done. The Nats move was immediately countered by Nationals major league players announcing that they would cover what the organization would not.

The A’s are, apparently, still sticking to their plan. The Nats, however, have reversed course:

One can easily imagine a situation in which Nats ownership just decided, cold-heartedly, to lop that hundred bucks off of each minor league check and not worry about a moment longer. What’s harder to imagine is what seems to have actually happened: the Nats did it without realizing that anyone would take issue with it, were surprised by the blowback, and then reversed course. Like, what kind of a bubble where they living in that they did not think people would consider that a low-rent thing to do?

In any event, good move, Nats, even if I cannot even begin to comprehend your thought process.