Report: Alex Rodriguez meets with MLB about Biogenesis

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According to the Associated Press, Alex Rodriguez had his long-awaited meeting yesterday with MLB’s investigators regarding his alleged connection to Biogenesis. If you are looking for any juicy details, well, there’s just not much to report.

The meeting took place Friday before the New York Yankees third baseman’s latest injury rehabilitation game in the minor leagues was rained out.

While A-Rod didn’t speak with reporters Friday, the meeting was confirmed by a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.

MLB investigators are probing the closed anti-aging clinic Biogenesis. Rodriguez has said he used PEDs while with Texas from 2001-03 but has denied using them since. He was linked to Biogenesis in a report in January by Miami New Times.

It was not known whether Rodriguez refused to answer MLB’s questions.

We heard earlier this week that Ryan Braun refused to answer questions from MLB’s investigators. While it’s not confirmed whether Rodriguez had a similar approach, that was certainly the expectation going in. While the report from ESPN.com earlier this week said that MLB is prepared to hand out 100-game suspensions sometime after the All-Star break, our own Craig Calcaterra was told by a source that the timeline and severity of the Biogenesis discipline has not been determined. However, the process could accelerate now that a conversation with Rodriguez, or lack thereof, is out of the way.

Rodriguez, who is coming back from January hip surgery, is 2-for-15 (.133) with one RBI through six minor league rehab games. He hasn’t been able to play since Wednesday due to inclement weather.

Please trade Manny Machado already, will ya?

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Manny Machado has been on the trading block for some time now, and he’s obviously a highly sought-after player who will command a nice haul for the Orioles if and when they deal him. Until they do that, however, let us talk for a moment about how to read a given trade rumor that gets tweeted or reported out into the ether.

Let’s look at the latest one, shall we? It goes like this:

At the outset, let me be clear about something: I do not doubt this reporting. Heyman is well-sourced, and I’m sure he’s hearing this exact thing. But so too are other reporters reporting other things, such as a rumor that floated around yesterday that the Phillies were in the lead. And so too are the guys who, several days ago, reported that a Machado trade was “on the 10 yard line.” Yesterday some random person on Twitter, claiming they had inside info, reached out to me to tell me that the O’s and the Phillies had a “handshake deal” in place (which sounded totally bogus, BTW). It’s all so imminent and urgent-sounding.

It’s urgent-sounding not because fast-paced and urgent activity is happening. Some GMs are texting one another, just like they always do. Some are making offers and waiting to hear from the Orioles, some are getting counters from the Orioles and are considering them. The GMs of two teams competing for Machado are not, themselves, in communication. In that respect it is decidedly not like a horse race or a football game.

The Orioles want it to be one, though, and make no mistake, that’s where these rumors are coming from.

The Orioles have a vested interest in the Dodgers, Brewers and Phillies upping their bids to beat out the other suitors, and it’s hard not to see all of these reports as stuff the Orioles are telling reporters in order to get the other clubs to think they’re going to miss out. It’s the Orioles and the Orioles alone who have a vested interest in this appearing more like a horse race — or a football game — and thus are cultivating horse race coverage. Whether it’s coordinated or whether it’s just random people in Baltimore telling what they know to reporters I have no idea, but that’s what this is.

That’s interesting to me as a media guy, and I guess it’s interesting to fans of the teams involved, but it’s probably good to remember that it’s less baseball news, proper, than it is a team using the media to get leverage.