Report: Alex Rodriguez meets with MLB about Biogenesis

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According to the Associated Press, Alex Rodriguez had his long-awaited meeting yesterday with MLB’s investigators regarding his alleged connection to Biogenesis. If you are looking for any juicy details, well, there’s just not much to report.

The meeting took place Friday before the New York Yankees third baseman’s latest injury rehabilitation game in the minor leagues was rained out.

While A-Rod didn’t speak with reporters Friday, the meeting was confirmed by a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because no statements were authorized.

MLB investigators are probing the closed anti-aging clinic Biogenesis. Rodriguez has said he used PEDs while with Texas from 2001-03 but has denied using them since. He was linked to Biogenesis in a report in January by Miami New Times.

It was not known whether Rodriguez refused to answer MLB’s questions.

We heard earlier this week that Ryan Braun refused to answer questions from MLB’s investigators. While it’s not confirmed whether Rodriguez had a similar approach, that was certainly the expectation going in. While the report from ESPN.com earlier this week said that MLB is prepared to hand out 100-game suspensions sometime after the All-Star break, our own Craig Calcaterra was told by a source that the timeline and severity of the Biogenesis discipline has not been determined. However, the process could accelerate now that a conversation with Rodriguez, or lack thereof, is out of the way.

Rodriguez, who is coming back from January hip surgery, is 2-for-15 (.133) with one RBI through six minor league rehab games. He hasn’t been able to play since Wednesday due to inclement weather.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.