Jason Heyward leaves game with strained right hamstring

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Troubling development for the first-place Braves, as David O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that Jason Heyward left tonight’s game against the Reds with a strained right hamstring.

After reaching on an infield single with two outs in the second inning, Heyward was advancing to third base on a single by Justin Upton before he hurt himself on a slide into the bag. The 23-year-old outfielder grabbed at his hamstring while laying on the ground before eventually getting to his feet and walking off under his own power. He’s scheduled to be reevaluated tomorrow, but it certainly looked like something that could require a trip to the disabled list.

Heyward has had a disappointing first half, batting .223/.321/.367 with seven home runs and 21 RBI in 67 games. He was previously sidelined from April 21-May 16 following an emergency appendectomy. Losing Heyward for any length of time hurts, but the Braves are slated to get both Evan Gattis and Jordan Schafer back from the disabled list right after the All-Star break.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.