And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Brewers 4, Reds 3: Holy moly that was a crazy game-ending catch for Carlos Gomez, robbing Joey Votto of the go-ahead home run:

Incredible.

Rays 7, Twins 4: The Rays continue to roll, winning their ninth in ten chances. Joe Maddon talked about his team going ten games over .500:

“The thing I like is that we’re 10 games over,” Maddon said. “You’ve got to go to 10, then you’ve got to go to 15, etc., etc. The major takeaway from tonight is the fact that we’re 10 games over.”

That’s the baseball version of the “this one goes to 11” thing from “This is Spinal Tap.”

Rangers 8, Orioles 5: Scott Feldman’s second start for the Orioles was not as good as his first as his old mates from Texas pounded him for seven runs, chasing him in the middle of their six-run sixth inning. Ian Kinsler had four RBI including a bases-clearing double. Baltimore stranded ten runners and went 1 for 12 with runners in scoring condition.

Phillies 3, Nationals 2: John Lannan had a way better against-his-former-mates performance than Feldman did as the Phillies continue to take it to the guys in front of them in the NL East. Dan Haren, meanwhile, looked better than he had following a couple of weeks on the disabled list but was outdueled. If he had won it would have given him a win against every MLB team in his career. Oh well, maybe next time.

Athletics 2, Pirates 1: Bartolo Colon keeps on rolling along, allowing one run in seven innings and improving to 12-3 with a 2.69 ERA. Jeff Locke — another surprise ace this year — lost for the first time since his first start of the season. Coco Crisp had a cool diving catch to record the last out while Colon was in the game.

Tigers 4, Indians 2: Victor Martinez’s two-run double in the tenth helps Detroit wrap up the series by taking its third of four from the upstart Tribe. Max Scherzer’s no decision keeps his loss-free record intact. It was the first Indians loss in extra innings this year.

Braves 7, Marlins 1: When a game goes 14 innings you don’t expect it to end with a six-run spread, but this one did. Chris Hatcher came in for the Marlins in the top of that inning and gave up a two-run double to Justin Upton, a two-run single and a single to Gerald Laird which led to an error allowing in the unearned final run.

Royals 5, Yankees 1: Jeremy Guthrie came back despite an hour rain delay and pitched into the seventh. Alex Gordon, David Lough and Johnny Giavotella had RBI doubles, Alcides Escobar had an RBI triple. The Yankees lineup may have been the most anonymous one they’ve fielded since the first Bush administration.

Dodgers 6, Diamondbacks 1: Zack Greinke tossed seven shutout innings allowing only two hits — one less hit than he himself had at the plate — as the Dodgers end the Dbacks’ winning streak and pull to within three and a half. The white-hot Hanley Ramirez extended his hitting streak to 19 games. No brawls to report.

Cubs 8, White Sox 2: Matt Garza continues to build his trade value, allowing one earned run over seven innings. Alfonso Soriano is a perpetual trade candidate and that ship may have already sailed, but he added three hits — including a homer — four runs and a steal. The battle of Chicago has zero playoff significance, but I’m sure people in Chicago enjoy it. Maybe. I dunno.

Rockies 4, Padres 2:  Tyler Chatwood took a comebacker off his leg, stayed in the game and still took a shutout into the seventh. The Padres dropped their tenth in a row. In other news, yesterday I bought tickets to a Padres game in late September which I am now realizing will have very little significance in the grand scheme of things. But hey, I’ll be on a weekend trip to California and that’s it’s own reward.

Mariners 11, Red Sox 4: King Felix allowed two runs over seven and got a bunch of run support, including a home run from Raul Ibanez, who is giving me some hope as I sit here, five days away from my 40th birthday. Jon Lester’s one-run performance against San Diego last Wednesday now looks like a mere blip on an otherwise craptacular stretch of pitching.

Mets 4, Giants 3: A sixteen-inning, five-hour, twenty-six minute game in which the winning run scored on an error? Sounds absolutely riveting. Nine shutout innings from the Mets pen and nine earned run-free innings from the Giants pen is pretty impressive though. This was the fourth 15-inning (or more) game the Mets had played this year and their first win in said contests.

Noah Syndergaard on Mets extending Jacob deGrom: ‘Pay the man already.’

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March has marked contract extension season across Major League Baseball. Just in the last week, we have seen Justin Verlander, Chris Sale, Brandon Lowe, Alex Bregman, Ryan Pressly, Mike Trout, Eloy Jiménez, Blake Snell, and Paul Goldschmidt sign extensions. Nolan Arenado, Luis Severino, and Aaron Nola also notably signed extensions during the offseason.

One name strikingly absent from that list: Mets ace Jacob deGrom. The reigning NL Cy Young Award winner is coming off of a season in which he posted a 1.70 ERA with 269 strikeouts and 46 walks across 217 innings. It’s the lowest ERA by a qualified starter since Zack Greinke‘s 1.66 in 2015. Prior to Greinke, no pitcher had posted an ERA of 1.70 or lower since Greg Maddux in 1994-95 (1.56, 1.63).

deGrom is earning $17 million this season and will enter his fourth and final year of arbitration eligibility going into the 2020 season. He will turn 31 years old in June, but is an obvious extension candidate for the Mets, who have built arguably their most competitive team since 2015, when the club lost the World Series in five games to the Royals. Thus far, though, the Mets and deGrom haven’t been able to get anywhere in extension talks.

deGrom’s rotation mate Noah Syndergaard is watching. Per MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, Syndergaard said, “I think Jake’s the best pitcher in baseball right now. I think he deserves whatever amount he’s worth. I want them to keep him happy so when it does come time for him to reach free agency, he stays on our side pitching for the Mets. I just think they should quit all the fuss and pay the man already.”

Syndergaard added that the recent extension trend around baseball — and deGrom’s lack of an extension to date — sends a message. He said, “I think so, yes, because of what you see in what’s going on in baseball right now. If there wasn’t a trend of other guys getting contract extensions, then I don’t know what the circumstance would be. But you see Chris Sale, Verlander getting extensions. I think it’s time Jacob gets one too.”

Part of the equation behind the recent rash of extensions is the stagnation of free agency. Craig Kimbrel and Dallas Keuchel — two of baseball’s better pitchers — have gone through almost an entire spring training without being signed. Bryce Harper and Manny Machado didn’t find new homes until late February. Free agents in their 30’s are largely being underpaid or otherwise forgotten about. Extensions represent financial security for young and old players alike. Syndergaard himself can become a free agent after the 2021 season, so if deGrom’s prospects improve, then so too will his, at least without knowing the details of the next collective bargaining agreement which will be put into place ahead of the 2022 season.