Nationals “have kicked the tires on” Matt Garza

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Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post has it:

The Nationals have kicked the tires on Cubs right-hander Matt Garza, one person familiar with the situation said. Talks between the teams have not progressed to the point of the Nationals offering the Cubs a formal proposal.

Garza is also thought to be drawing trade interest from the Orioles, Rangers, Red Sox, Blue Jays, Indians and Dodgers, so he is not going to be an easy (or inexpensive) get for the team that ultimately acquires him.

Eduardo Encina of the Baltimore Sun reported Saturday that the Cubs wanted two of the Orioles’ top five prospects — infielder Jonathan Schoop and left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez — in exchange for Garza.

Garza has an excellent 3.45 ERA, 1.12 WHIP and 52/18 K/BB ratio through his first 57 1/3 innings this season with Chicago. The 29-year-old is scheduled to hit the free agent market in November.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.