The All-Star Game rosters have been unveiled

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Via MLB’s official Twitter, here are the starting position players for the 2013 All-Star Game at Citi Field:

Nothing too shocking on the National League side of things. In a more Sabermetrically-inclined universe, Matt Carpenter could have gotten the nod over Brandon Phillips. If Troy Tulowitzki isn’t healthy enough to return, you’ll see either Jean Segura or Everth Cabrera at shortstop. “CarGo” refers to Rockies outfielder Carlos Gonzalez, not Carlos Gomez of the Brewers. Gomez probably should have gotten the nod over Bryce Harper given the playing time disparity. (By the way, Harper’s 201 PA total is closer to that of Yasiel Puig — 127 — than Gomez’s 325.)

In the American League, one could make a solid numbers-based case for Jason Kipnis over both Robinson Cano and Dustin Pedroia. Jhonny Peralta has been markedly better than J.J. Hardy but has half the home run total. Adam Jones could have been a reserve in favor of someone like Brett Gardner or Jacoby Ellsbury.

The pitchers:

Shocking not to see Stephen Strasburg, 4-6 but with a 2.24 ERA, not make it. Adam Wainwright won’t pitch in the All-Star Game, so it seems pretty open-and-shut that Matt Harvey gets the nod to start the game in his team’s stadium. With Jason Kipnis on the roster, the “one player from each team” rule was satisfied, making it odd that Justin Masterson earned a spot while Royals hurler Ervin Santana was left off. But other than that, there aren’t any huge omissions as far as AL pitchers go. And the reserves:

Allen Craig getting the last first base roster spot for the NL over Freddie Freeman is sure to cause some debate. In a surprisingly stacked year at the position, Ian Desmond has been the fourth-best shortstop in the NL, which may explain why he didn’t make the cut. Where is Reds center fielder Shin-Soo Choo and his .417 on-base percentage?

Josh Donaldson is the biggest AL omission that jumps out at you. The Athletics third baseman has a .903 OPS, fourth-best among all MLB third basemen and third-best in the American League behind Miguel Cabrera and Evan Longoria. Longoria, by the way, also not an All-Star.

The Final Vote candidates:

We may see Yasiel Puig in the All-Star Game, after all. The Cuban, setting the baseball world on fire, has a 1.155 OPS through his first 30 Major League games. All five of the AL candidates are pitchers, and relievers at that. Would that we could submit two Final Votes for NL players and zero for the AL in this case.

Maddon: Shohei Ohtani won’t pitch again for Angels this year

Shohei Ohtani
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Shohei Ohtani won’t pitch again this season for the Los Angeles Angels after straining his right forearm in his second start, manager Joe Maddon says.

Ohtani likely will return to the Angels’ lineup as their designated hitter this week, Maddon said Tuesday night before the club opened a road series against the Seattle Mariners.

The Angels’ stance on Ohtani is unsurprising after the club announced he had strained the flexor pronator mass near the elbow of his pitching arm. The two-way star’s recovery from the strain requires him to abstain from throwing for four to six weeks, which covers most of the shortened 2020 season.

“I’m not anticipating him pitching at all this year,” Maddon said. “Any kind of throwing program is going to be very conservative.”

Ohtani was injured Sunday in the second inning of his second start since returning to the mound following Tommy John surgery in late 2018. Ohtani issued five walks during the 42-pitch inning against the Houston Astros, with his velocity dropping later in the frame.

The arm injury is another obstacle in Ohtani’s path to becoming the majors’ first true two-way player in decades. He made 10 mound starts as a rookie in 2018 before injuring his elbow, but he served as the Angels’ regular designated hitter last season while recovering from Tommy John surgery.

Ohtani has pitched in only three games since June 2018, but the Angels still believe in Ohtani’s ability to be a two-way player, Maddon said.

“I’m seeing that he can,” Maddon said. “We’ve just got to get past the arm maladies and figure that out. But I’ve seen it. He’s just such a high-end arm, and we’ve seen what he can do in the batter’s box. Now maybe it might get to the point where he may choose to do one thing over the other and express that to us. I know he likes to hit. In my mind’s eye, he’s still going to be able to do this.”

The veteran manager believes Ohtani will benefit from a full spring training and a normal season. Ohtani wasn’t throwing at full strength for a starter when the coronavirus pandemic shut down spring training in March because he wasn’t expected to pitch until May as he returned from surgery.

“Going into a regular season with a normal number of starts and all the things that permit guys to be ready for a year, that’s what we need to see is some normalcy before you make that kind of determination,” Maddon said.

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