Manny Ramirez will likely make Minor League debut on Sunday

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Manny Ramirez will likely get his 2013 season started on Sunday with Triple-A Round Rock, reports Anthony Andro of FOX Sports Southwest. The Rangers recently signed the controversial 41-year-old slugger to a Minor League deal in what amounts to a low-risk, medium-reward flier.

We last saw Ramirez in the Majors in 2011 when he had a very short-lived, controversy-laden stint with the Tampa Bay Rays. He posted a .118 OPS before failing a drug test, prompting his retirement. During the off-season, he requested and was granted reinstatement into Major League Baseball, then signed a Minor League deal with the Athletics as spring training began. With Triple-A Sacramento, Ramirez posted a .697 OPS in 69 trips to the plate. He requested his release from the team. During the off-season, he played in the Dominican Professional Baseball League.

Ramirez signed with the EDA Rhinos of the Chinese Professional Baseball League in Taiwan for the 2013 season. There, he finally found success at the dish, hitting .352 with eight homers and 43 RBI in 49 games. Ramirez opted out of his contract with the Rhinos on June 15, then signed with the Rangers, effectively starting the next chapter of his waning baseball career.

Love him or hate him, you can’t slight the guy’s passion for the game. Not many 40-year-olds, let alone those who have done as much on the field and earned as much money as Ramirez has in his career, would traverse the globe to continue playing for relative peanuts in relative obscurity. And in a season in which Raul Ibanez is helping us rethink what we know about 40-year-olds playing baseball, it wouldn’t be the strangest thing if Ramirez hit his way back into the Majors.

MLB orders Josh Hader to sensitivity training, participation in diversity initiatives

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Major League Baseball released a statement about Josh Hader a few minutes ago. Here it is in its entirety:

“During last night’s game we became aware of Mr. Hader’s unacceptable social media comments in years past and have since been in communication with the Brewers regarding our shared concerns.  After the game, Mr. Hader took the necessary step of expressing remorse for his highly offensive and hurtful language, which fails to represent the values of our game and our expectations for all those who are a part of it.  The Office of the Commissioner will require sensitivity training for Mr. Hader and participation in MLB’s diversity and inclusion initiatives.”

People can parse Hader’s apology if they want to — I wrote about what I feel like Hader needs to say and do to show that his tweets truly are not representative of who he is now — but this is probably about as well as Major League Baseball can do with this. The tweets in question occurred years ago, before Hader was in professional baseball. They even occurred before Major League Baseball had a formal social media policy. MLB attempting some sort of way-after-the-fact punitive action on Hader like a fine or a suspension would (a) be met with some understandable resistance by Hader and the union; and (b) would look more like the league trying to deal with a P.R. crisis more than dealing with the player.

That being said, the sensitivity training and diversity initiative participation makes loads of sense. If, as Hader said last night, he’s a different person now than he was back in 2011-12, he should embrace such activities. They’re positive ones and, hey, who couldn’t use a brush-up? If his claims of being a changed man were merely a reaction to a social media firestorm, well, that’ll be dealt with pretty well in those arenas as well. Either way, this gives Hader an opportunity to put his money where his mouth is.

If you think making Hader do such things is “punishment,” well, that opens up another conversation altogether I suppose.