Edward Mujica on first blown save: “I didn’t follow Yadi and that’s a mistake”

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Edward Mujica has been brilliant since stepping into the Cardinals’ closer role, converting 21 consecutive saves with a 2.20 ERA and 25/1 K/BB ratio in 28.2 innings heading into last night.

And then last night against the Angels he blew his first save of the season by serving up a game-tying two-run homer to Josh Hamilton and a game-winning single to Erick Aybar, with both hits coming on changeups.

After the game Mujica explained to Jenifer Langosch of MLB.com that catcher Yadier Molina had called for a fastball on both pitches:

With a 1-0 count against Hamilton, Molina called for an inside fastball. Mujica shook it off, wanting to throw his signature split-changeup. Hamilton crushed it for a two-run homer. … Nine-hole hitter Erick Aybar worked the count to 2-1, at which point Molina, again, called fastball. Mujica instead went back to his changeup. Aybar dropped it into left to send the Cardinals to their second walk-off loss of the season.

“I didn’t follow Yadi, and that’s a mistake I can’t make anymore,” Mujica said. “From now on, I’m just going with Yadi. It was a big mistake.”

Molina is such an amazing defensive catcher and is consistently given so much credit for the Cardinals’ success that shaking him off leading to blown saves makes for a very interesting narrative. It’s at least worth noting, however, that Mujica’s changeup has been an incredibly effective pitch. In fact, according to Fan Graphs it’s been one of the 10 best pitches thrown by relievers this season. I’ll be curious to track if Mujica throws it less often going forward.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.