Report: Biogenesis source agrees to cooperate with “the biggest scumbags on Earth”

31 Comments

According to TMZ, former Biogenesis employee Porter Fischer has struck a deal with Major League Baseball in which he will turn over all information he has and Major League Baseball will pay Fischer a “consultant” fee. Major League Baseball is apparently in the process of interviewing him.

Fischer, you may recall, recently described Major League Baseball as “the biggest scumbags on Earth”  in an interview with the Miami New Times. There he complained that baseball has using high-handed and hardball tactics in an effort to get Biogenesis information and claimed he was more or less screwed over by the league and by Anthony Bosch and that the whole mess has led to threats to his property and safety. Now things are different, apparently and he, Bosch and MLB are all on the same side.

As I noted in my followup to the Fisher business, this guy comes off as something less than a straightforward, reliable narrator. Maybe he has the goods on some players. Maybe he doesn’t. But based on what he’s said in that interview just two weeks ago, he’s either going to have to (a) testify that his fellow witness-against-the-players Anthony Bosch is an evil duplicitous person who can’t be trusted; or (b) admit that he himself lied in that interview and now, once he’s being paid by MLB, he’s being truthful.

So good luck with that.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

AP Photo
4 Comments

FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.