And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Mets 5, Diamondbacks 4: Arizona took two leads in this game: a 3-0 lead they held for most of it and then, after the Mets tied it in the ninth, a 4-3 lead in the 13th. The ultimate rally was capped with Andrew Brown’s two-run single. The best part of that, though: Kirk Gibson ordered an intentional walk to John Buck before that. John Buck who SCORED THE WINNING RUN. John Buck who was 0 for 4 at that point. John Buck who is hitting .205. Any time you can put the winning run on base, you totally gotta do that, right? I think that’s in the grit handbook.

Yankees 10, Twins 4: Andy Pettitte, who has admitted to using performance enhancing drugs, passed Whitey Ford, who is well known for doctoring baseballs, for the Yankees all-time strikeout record. Two homers for Robinson Cano, as the Yankees snap their five-game losing streak.

Nationals 10, Brewers 5: Bryce Harper came back from the DL and smacked a homer on the second pitch he saw. Jayson Werth had the bigger bat, though, driving in five. Jordan Zimmermann won his 12th and had three hits of his own.

Blue Jays 8, Tigers 3: A happy Canada Day it was, eh, as the Jays topped the Tigers behind R.A. Dickey’s seven innings of two-run ball. Detroit fel behind by five runs and any hopes they had of coming back were crushed when Mark DeRosa hit a three-run bomb.

Reds 8, Giants 1: It has rained in Ohio for a week straight, so no real surprise this one was rain-shortened. Mercifully so, really. Giants pitcher Michael Kickham: not exactly the answer to San Francisco’s rotation problems. He has started three times, two of them have gone shorter than three innings and, in order, he has given up 4, 5 and 7 runs on 4, 8 and 9 hits, respectively.

Rays 12, Astros 0: The bottom third of the Rays order went 9 for 15 with six RBI. Matt Moore tossed seven two-hit shutout innings for his 11th win.

Marlins 4, Padres 0: Jose Fernandez topped Moore, tossing eight two-hit shutout innings and fanning ten. All four of the Marlins runs were unearned.

Astros hitting coach receives 20-game suspension; A’s Laureano six

Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports
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OAKLAND, Calif. — Houston Astros hitting coach Alex Cintron received a 20-game suspension and a fine Tuesday for his role in a benches-clearing brawl at Oakland, while Athletics outfielder Ramon Laureano was given a six-game suspension and a fine.

Cintron’s suspension is the longest for an on-field transgression in 15 years, since Texas pitcher Kenny Rogers received 20 games for his altercation with two cameramen in 2005.

“I accept MLB’s suspension and will learn from this,” Cintron said in a statement. “Although I never referenced Ramon’s mother, my actions were inappropriate. I apologize for my part in Sunday’s unfortunate incident. As coaches, we are held to a higher standard and should be an example to the players. Hopefully, other coaches will learn from my mistake so that this never happens again in the future.”

Laureano appealed, so his discipline didn’t begin Tuesday night in Oakland’s game against the Angels. He was in the lineup batting second and playing center field at Angel Stadium.

Laureano was hit by a pitch from Humberto Castellanos with one out in the seventh inning of Oakland’s 7-2 victory Sunday. He began exchanging words with a gesturing Cintron then left first base, threw down his batting helmet and began sprinting toward the 41-year-old Cintron.

Astros catcher Dustin Garneau tackled Laureano before the A’s outfielder got to the hitting coach. Laureano is a former Astros player and the rival clubs have been the top two in the AL West the past two years. A’s pitcher Mike Fiers, another former Houston player, revealed the Astros’ sign-stealing scandal in November to The Athletic.

Laureano was hit for the third time in the weekend series swept by Oakland – the fifth time the A’s were hit in all while the Astros didn’t get plunked once – and he pointed at Castellanos.

Players rushed out of both dugouts. Laureano was ejected by plate umpire Ted Barrett, and the umpiring crew could easily be heard yelling at the players to “get back to the dugout!” through a ballpark with no fans.

“I just thought that, whew, boy they threw the book at us big time. But what can you do?” said Astros manager Dusty Baker, who had already been ejected by the time the brawl occurred and didn’t see it on TV. “The ruling is the ruling. I talked to the powers that be in the commissioner’s office this afternoon and we had a good conversation. So … we have to deal with it and hopefully this brings our guys even closer together. He was a big part of our team.”

The A’s lost the AL wild-card game each of the past two seasons after winning 97 games both years to place second in the AL West behind three-time reigning division champion Houston, which won a World Series in 2017 and an AL pennant last season.

Laureano began Tuesday batting .259 with three homers and 10 RBIs as the A’s regular center fielder and No. 2 hitter.

“It’s just something we have to deal with,” Oakland manager Bob Melvin said of the suspension. “I don’t make those decisions, and whatever I think about them doesn’t really matter anyway, so I think the best thing to do is try to get it behind us as quickly as we can.”

Melvin wasn’t sure how he would potentially structure his outfield and lineup without Laureano for several games.

“You can’t replace him,” Melvin said. “You just have to play short.”

The Dodgers and Astros had their own dustup when Los Angeles visited Houston last month. LA lost the ’17 World Series to the Astros when the sign-stealing scam was happening.

In announcing the punishments, MLB said Cintron’s discipline was “for his role in inciting and escalating the conflict between the two clubs.” Given the coronavirus pandemic, baseball has established strict guidelines about avoiding brawls.

“The explanation was that he’s a coach and especially with the COVID situation out here … in essence they’re not going to stand for it,” Baker said. “Basically, somebody had to be the example. Especially in these times that we’re going through.”

A former infielder from Puerto Rico, Cintron played parts of nine major league seasons with Arizona, the Chicago White Sox, Baltimore and Washington. He won’t be eligible to coach again until Sept. 2, when the Astros are scheduled to host Texas.

“Cintron said what he did was wrong, and he apologized for it,” Baker said. “It still doesn’t take the fact away that it happened.”