Yankees, A-Rod, slowly getting back on the same page … with an assist from Derek Jeter

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You get the impression that the Yankees have figured out that the cuckoo 36 hours or so in which A-Rod tweeted, Cashman bleated and then the rumors about A-Rod’s sinister plot to do, well, something, weren’t in the team’s best interestes. Because based on this story in the Daily News, things are sorta getting back to normal:

Derek Jeter, also rehabbing in Tampa, said Thursday that Rodriguez, who has missed the first three months of the season due to hip surgery in January, looks like he can still be a contributing player to the Yankees.

“Alex works extremely hard,” said Jeter, who is in Tampa to rehab the left ankle he broke during the 2012 playoffs. “He is working hard now to get back.”

Then:

Meanwhile, a Yankee source and a Rodriguez spokesperson both shot down multiple reports that A-Rod had told the Yankees — including GM Brian Cashman and team president Randy Levine on a call Wednesday — that he didn’t think he could come back this year.

The Yankee source told the Daily News the reports are “fantasy.”

If the Captain offers some support in A-Rod’s direction and the team calls a report that makes A-Rod look bad a “fantasy” one gets the sense that a decision has been made to try to put this fire out.

My guess: next thing we hear from anyone in all of this will be when A-Rod is actually cleared to play.

Kirk Gibson home run happened 30 years ago

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With the Dodgers trying to make it back to the World Series for the second year in a row — and trying to win it for the first time in 30 years — it’s worth looking back at the last time they won it. More specifically, it’s worth looking back at the signature moment from the last time they won it. Which, really, was one of baseball’s all-time signature moments.

Yep, I’m talking about Kirk Gibson’s famous game-winning home run off of Dennis Eckersley of the Oakland Athletics in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, which happened 30 years ago tonight.

All playoff magic for anyone too young to remember Bill Mazeroski’s homer in 1960 is measured against Gibson taking Dennis Eckersley downtown to turn a 4-3 deficit into a 5-4 win. Heck, even if you were around in 1960, it’s far less likely that you saw Mazeroski’s homer than it was for you to have seen Gibson’s. Nationally broadcast in prime time to a nation of millions who had not yet fragmented into viewers of hundreds of obscure cable channels and various forms of streaming entertainments, it was a moment that sent shockwaves through the world of sports.

For my part, I was fifteen years-old, sitting in my living room in Beckley, West Virginia watching it as it happened. Like most of the rest of the country, I was convinced that the Dodgers had no chance to beat the mighty Bash Brothers and the 104-win Oakland A’s. Especially given that the Dodgers’ leader, MVP-to-be Gibson, was hobbled and not starting. Even when he was called on to pinch hit, I had no faith that he’d be able to touch Eckersley, the best relief pitcher on the planet, let alone hit the ball with any kind of authority.

But, as Vin said when he called it, the Dodgers’ year was so improbable that, in hindsight, it made perfect sense for Gibson to have done the impossible: