Corey Hart is now having problems with his left knee

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Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel has the report:

As it turns out, first baseman Corey Hart now is having trouble with his left knee — the opposite knee from the one that has kept him out all season following late-January surgery. Apparently, concentraing so much on rehabbing his “bad” knee caused the other one to flare up.

Now, Hart is en route to Los Angeles to get a second opinion from the Dodgers’ orthopedist, Neal ElAttrache, to see what’s going on in the left knee.

Hart was expected to be ready by mid-to-late May, but he hasn’t progressed past light running and rounds of live batting practice. It’s now impossible to map out any sort of timetable for his return.

Brewers first basemen have batted .180/.222/.284 with five home runs and 38 RBI through 74 games this season. Hart, 31, hit .270/.334/.507 with 30 home runs and 83 RBI in 149 games last year.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.