Justin Verlander is unlikely to pitch in the All-Star Game

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Tigers ace Justin Verlander has a 3.72 ERA and 1.35 WHIP in 92 innings this season, so he might not get invited to the 2013 All-Star Game anyway.

If he is invited, he almost certainly won’t pitch.

As noted by James Schmehl of MLive.com, Verlander is penciled in to make his final first-half start on Sunday, July 14, just two days before the July 16 Midsummer Classic at New York’s Citi Field. Per the Major League Baseball rulebook, starting pitchers used that Sunday are not be eligible to pitch in the All-Star Game on Tuesday night. So it would take some kind of change in the Tigers’ schedule for the situation to change.

Verlander started the 2012 All-Star Game at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City and allowed five earned runs in the first inning to the National League. The American League wound up losing that game by a score of 8-0.

Tom Ricketts says the Cubs don’t have any more money

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Cubs owner Tom Ricketts met the media in Mesa, Arizona today and said a couple of things that were fun.

First, he addressed the controversy that arose earlier this month when emails of his father’s — family patriarch Joe Ricketts — were leaked, showing him forwarding and approvingly commenting on racist jokes. Ricketts apologized for those serving as a “distraction” for the Cubs which, OK. He also said “Those aren’t the values our family was raised with… I never heard my father say anything remotely racist.” If you choose to believe that a 77-year-old conservative guy who loves racist emails — who once spearheaded an anti-Obama ad campaign that required a “literate African-American” as its spokesman — hasn’t said racist stuff a-plenty, that’s between you and your credulity.

More relevant to the 2019 Cubs is this:

The Cubs aren’t in the same position as some other contenders in that (a) they don’t have a cheap payroll; and (b) are not obvious candidates for the big free agents like Harper or Machado, but I still find that comment pretty rich for an owner of one of baseball’s marquee franchises in a non-salary cap league. If nothing else, it’s an admission by Ricketts that he, like the other owners, consider the Luxury Tax to be a defacto salary cap.