Wanna Buy Billy Beane’s house?

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It’s in Danville, California. I assume that he’s selling it so he can buy a place in Santa Clara County, what with the lawsuit and all. I also assume any sale will be contingent on a thorough plumbing inspection:

Located roughly 40 minutes east of the O.co Coliseum, Beane’s home offers 4,836 square feet of living space and has an office and a bonus room to go along with the five en suites. Inside, cherrywood and travertine flooring can be found throughout, while other luxe touches include crown molding, custom draperies and silhouettes. Outside, the more than half-acre grounds feature a sparkling pool and an elevated spa.

Based on the photos of the place, I assume bland, model home-style suburban McMansion furnishings are the new inefficiency.

Beane and his wife bought it in 2002, as “Moneyball” was being researched and written. They purchased it for $1.735 million. It’s listing for $1.895 million. Which means he got way more value out of Scott Hatteberg than he did this particular real estate investment.

[Beane throws a chair, reduces listing price by the value of the chair and the damage to the wall]

Donaldson ejected for kicking dirt on plate after home run

David Banks-USA TODAY Sports
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Minnesota’s Josh Donaldson managed to get ejected while hitting a home run.

Donaldson barked at plate umpire Dan Bellino for the second time in the sixth inning of a 4-3 loss to the Chicago White Sox on Thursday.

With the score 2-2, Bellino called a strike when the 2015 AL MVP checked his swing on a 2-0 pitch from Reynaldo Lopez.

Manager Rocco Baldelli came out to speak with Bellino, and Donaldson homered down the left-field line on the next offering. After rounding the bases, Donaldson kicked dirt at home plate as he crossed it.

Bellino ejected him immediately, and Donaldson, realizing he had missed home plate, returned to the plate to touch it and then argued as he kicked more dirt on it.

Donaldson also had argued with Bellino on a 1-1 breaking ball in the first inning that appeared to be high but was called a strike, leading to a strikeout.

“We need Josh on the field, out there playing, and at third base,” Baldelli said. “That’s when we’re at our best. And so that’s really the end of it. I think we can move past it at his point, and go from here.”