Wanna Buy Billy Beane’s house?

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It’s in Danville, California. I assume that he’s selling it so he can buy a place in Santa Clara County, what with the lawsuit and all. I also assume any sale will be contingent on a thorough plumbing inspection:

Located roughly 40 minutes east of the O.co Coliseum, Beane’s home offers 4,836 square feet of living space and has an office and a bonus room to go along with the five en suites. Inside, cherrywood and travertine flooring can be found throughout, while other luxe touches include crown molding, custom draperies and silhouettes. Outside, the more than half-acre grounds feature a sparkling pool and an elevated spa.

Based on the photos of the place, I assume bland, model home-style suburban McMansion furnishings are the new inefficiency.

Beane and his wife bought it in 2002, as “Moneyball” was being researched and written. They purchased it for $1.735 million. It’s listing for $1.895 million. Which means he got way more value out of Scott Hatteberg than he did this particular real estate investment.

[Beane throws a chair, reduces listing price by the value of the chair and the damage to the wall]

Mariners sign Ichiro to a minor league deal

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USA Today’s Bob Nightengale reports that the Mariners will sign Ichiro Suzuki to a minor-league deal. If he makes the roster he’ll make $750,000. At least until he retires.

I say that because it seems quite clear that the idea here, telegraphed since last season, is to activate Ichiro for the Mariners’ series against the Oakland Athletics in Tokyo on March 20-21 and for hoopla surrounding it all. The Mariners and A’s will have a 28-man roster for that series, which is officially part of the regular season schedule, but it will be pared back down to 25 once games begin in the United States.

Suzuki, 45, hit .205/.255/.205 in 47 plate appearances through May 2 last season, at which point he agreed to be deactivated to join the Mariners’ front office. Many assumed Ichiro would announce his retirement later that season or during the offseason, but the Japan Series soon crystalized as an obvious way for him to offer his final farewell to both his American and his Japanese fans.

Unless of course he goes 6-10 with three doubles in that series, at which point everyone will be tempted to keep him on the roster past Japan. Which, given the Mariners’ rebuild and likely poor performance this coming season, wouldn’t exactly be hurting anyone, would it?