Jordan Norberto filed an injury grievance against the A’s

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Last month left-hander Jordan Norberto was released by the A’s after being sidelined by an elbow injury and the reliever underwent Tommy John surgery this week.

Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that Norberto has filed a grievance against the A’s, claiming that he should have been placed on the disabled list rather than released because he was already injured when Oakland optioned him to the minors at the end of spring training.

“I expected more from the team after the way I pitched for them last year,” Norberto told Slusser, adding that he was “disappointed” by how the whole thing played out. “But I’ll work hard and get a job with someone else.”

When the A’s released Norberto he was on the Triple-A disabled list with what was being called a strained elbow and was about halfway into a six-week recovery timetable. However, if Norberto was actually hurt earlier than that, before being demoted to the minors in late March, that information wasn’t reported on publicly. Could be an interesting case.

Meanwhile, he’ll miss all of this season and probably most of next season, wiping away any career momentum Norberto had after posting a 2.77 ERA and 46/22 K/BB ratio in 52 innings for the A’s last year.

Carter Stewart will get $7 million over six years to play for the Fukuoka Softbank Hawks

Associated Press
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Yesterday we wrote about Carter Stewart, the American pitcher who, after failing to sign with the Braves last year, went to junior college. Rather than re-enter the draft this year, Stewart has signed with the Fukuoka Softbank Hawks of the Japanese Pacific League.

Jeff Passan of ESPN has the details on that deal: $7 million for six years. That’s five million more than the lowball offer the Braves gave him after drafting him last year and over $2 million more than he would’ve gotten if the Braves had paid him slot last year. This year he was projected to be a second round pick, Passan says, so his slot bonus would’ve been under $2 million.

As Passan notes, though, he has the chance to make out far better than that, though. That’s because his six-year deal would allow the now-19-year-old Stewart to come back to the U.S. as a 25-year-old free agent via the posting system. Passan does some back-of-the-envelope figuring, comparing what he’d make in the U.S. had he stayed vs. the $7 million he’s now guaranteed in Japan:

In a near-optimal scenario, Stewart would receive around $4 million for the next six years — and would not reach free agency until after the 2027 season, when he will be 28. His deal with the Hawks would guarantee Stewart $3 million more and potentially allow him to hit free agency three years earlier.

He could flame out, of course. The Braves’ lowball offer was based on concerns about his wrist. Even without that, there are no guarantees when young arms are involved.

But there is a $7 million guarantee for Stewart now, and the chance to do better than if he had stayed in the U.S. And the opportunity was created, in large part, by Major League Baseball’s clamping down on pay for draft picks and doing whatever it can to extend team control over players via service time manipulation. Stewart, and his agent Scott Boras, are merely exploiting an inefficiency in the market.