Jason Grilli blows his first save of the year

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All good things must come to an end. Jason Grilli has been a good thing for the Pirates so far this year, but he was pretty unlikely to be perfect in save situations all year. And last night he blew his first save of the year.

Granted, it wasn’t an easy save. The Pirates led 1-0 entering the ninth inning thanks to seven shutout innings from Jeff Locke and one from Mark Melancon. Grilli was called in to lock it down against the Reds’ 4-5-6 hitters. He retired Brandon Phillips on a liner but then Jay Bruce swung at the first pitch he saw from Grilli and deposited it over the right field fence. Way over, actually, as it went out on a line and got out in a hurry. It was measured as a 425-foot blast.

Bruce, by the way, had taken a homer away from Andrew McCutchen in the seventh, making a leaping grab at the wall, so he had himself a day.

The Reds went on to win in 13. And, as all closers do, Grilli will have to shake it off and be ready again this afternoon. It’ll be a new thing for him, but I figure he’s up to it.

 

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.