Alex Rodriguez is making “fantastic” progress in his rehab from hip surgery

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The last we heard on Alex Rodriguez, he was set to face live pitching for the first time since his January hip surgery. As he continues to ramp up baseball activities, his rehab is apparently going off without a hitch. In fact, he’s receiving rave reviews for his progress.

Here’s the skinny from CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman:

Alex Rodriguez’s recent progress is said by people around the Yankees to have been dramatic, with one person calling it “fantastic” and another even speculating A-Rod could possibly begin to play rehab games just after the All-Star break.

There have been dire predictions about A-Rod’s future based on the circumstances of a player in his late 30s undergoing two major hip surgeries and all the rest of his history. But one Yankees person, hearing of his recent progress, marveled Wednesday about Rodriguez.

“He may beat everyone back,” the Yankees person said, meaning all the many other injured Yankees.

Of course, that’s assuming Rodriguez doesn’t receive a suspension for his alleged connection to Biogenesis first.

While many Yankees fans would like to see Rodriguez gone, he suddenly looks like a potential upgrade now that Kevin Youkilis is at risk of missing the rest of the season following back surgery. Entering play tonight, New York’s third baseman were tied for last in the AL in home runs and ranked 23rd in the majors in slugging percentage and 22nd in OPS.

MLB rejected Players’ 114-game season proposal, will not send a counter

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that Major League Baseball has rejected the MLBPA’s proposal for a 114-game season and said it would not send a counter offer. The league said it has started talks with owners “about playing a shorter season without fans, and that it is ready to discuss additional ideas with the union.”

This should be understood as a game of chicken.

The background here is that the the owners are pretty much locked into the idea of paying players a prorated share of their regular salaries based on number of games played. The players, meanwhile, are pretty much locked in to the idea that the owners can set the length of the season that is played. Each side is trying to leverage their power in this regard.

The players proposed a probably unworkable number of games — 114 — as a means of setting the bidding high on a schedule that will work out well for them financially. Say, a settled agreement at about 80 games or so. The owners were rumored to be considering a counteroffer of a low number of games — say, 50 — as a means of still getting a significant pay cut from the players even if they’re being paid prorata. What Rosenthal is now reporting is that they won’t even counter with that.

Which is to say that the owners are trying to get the players to come off of their prorated salary rights under the threat of a very short schedule that would end up paying them very little. They won’t formally offer that short schedule, however, likely because (a) they believe that the threat of uncertain action is more formidable; and (b) they don’t want to be in the position of publicly demanding fewer baseball games, which doesn’t look very good to fans. They’d rather be in the position of saying “welp, the players wouldn’t talk to us about money so we have no choice, they forced us into 50 games.”

In other news, the NBA seems very close to getting its season resumed.