Josh Hamilton had a nightmare game last night

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It’s hard to grasp how truly awful Josh Hamilton was on Tuesday night. He came to the plate five times. Here’s what happened:

  • First Inning: No score, Mike Trout on first, nobody out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Third Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Mike Trout on first, nobody out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Fifth Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Peter Bourjos on second, Mike Trout on first, one out, Hamilton grounds into a double play;
  • Seventh Inning: Mariners up 2-1, Chirs Ianetta on second, two outs, Hamilton strikes out;
  • Ninth Inning: Score tied 2-2, Erik Aybar on second, Chris Ianetta on first, two out, Hamilton strikes out.

Those were a lot of chances to tie the game, give the Angels the lead or, at the very least, keep an inning going and let someone else help out. Instead he left seven men on base, Anaheim lost in extra innings and Hamilton experienced perhaps his worst night in an Angels uniform.

For those of you who want a statistical measure of this badness, note that Hamilton’s Win Probability Added (WPA), which measures how much a player contributed to his team’s win or loss on a given day, was -.477. That means he, all by his lonesome, reduced the Angels’ chances of winning last night’s game by 47.7%.

On the bright side: only four more years to go on that contract after this one.

Astros release Jon Singleton

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The Astros have released first baseman Jon Singleton, Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle reports.

Singleton, 26, was suspended for 100 games after testing positive for a drug of abuse for a third time. He has had issues with marijuana in the post and admitted to being a drug addict several years ago. He said, “At this point it’s pretty evident to me that I’m a drug addict. I don’t openly tell everyone that, but it’s pretty apparent to myself. I know that I enjoy smoking weed, I enjoy being high and I can’t block that out of my mind that I enjoy that. So I have to work against that.”

Singleton played parts of two seasons in the majors in 2014-15 with the Astros, batting a combined .171/.290/.331 with 14 home runs and 50 RBI in — appropriately — 420 plate appearances. He spent 2016 with Triple-A Fresno and 2017 with Double-A Corpus Christi, putting up middling numbers.

If he can convince teams he’s still actively working to overcome his addiction, Singleton may be able to find an opportunity elsewhere. But his road back to the majors remains long. He was once a top prospect in the Phillies’ system, then was traded to the Astros in the Hunter Pence deal back in July 2011.