Fatigued ballplayers make worse decisions as the season goes on

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Drug dealers who sell greenies Vanderbilt University neurologist Scott Kutscher discovered something interesting:

To see whether baseball players suffer the effects of sleep loss as the season drags on (or skips along for six non-tedious months, depending on your inclinations), Kutscher and his colleagues looked at data from 2011 back to 2006, after the MLB cracked down on steroid use. For each team, they tracked how often players swung at pitches outside the strike zone. Over the course of the season, the researchers saw a steady increase in how many out-of-the-strike-zone pitches players swung at. These badly judged swings went up by about six-tenths of a percent each month.

There may be some other factors at play like less-experienced players filling out rosters late in the season, but Kutscher says that these results tracked what they’ve observed in other people who have suffered from fatigue and sleep-deprivation.

But I’m sure that players who took amphetamines to “pep up” before games back in the 60s and 70s didn’t experience any performance-enhancement at all.

(thanks to Morgan Jackson for the heads up)