Mets approached “Cougar Life” dating website in attempt to get All-Star votes for David Wright

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David Wright lost out to the Giants’ Pablo Sandoval in the balloting for the National League third base job on the All-Star team last season and he’s trailing him again in the voting this year. However, with the All-Star Game at Citi Field next month, the Mets are trying to pull out all the stops to get their hometown player into the starting lineup. And their push took them to an interesting place.

According to Deadspin, the Mets approached the niche dating website “Cougar Life” last Friday to see if they would be interested in promoting Wright’s All-Star campaign. That’s right, “Cougar Life.” There is a little bit of history with this website, as Wright apparently won something called “MLB’s Hottest Cub” earlier this year.

Anyway, after some back and forth, the Mets backed out of the potential arrangement. Still, the emails from the Mets were leaked to Deadspin, which was enough for the team to release a statement this afternoon.

“Cougar Life voted David Wright as the hottest cub. In our effort to expand All-Star balloting to wider audiences, so as to increase votes, we did reach out to Cougar Life. Last year there was a big swing of votes at the end that cost David the starting job. We decided to do everything to make sure that doesn’t happened again this year. We ultimately elected to pass. We thank whoever leaked this to Deadspin for increasing awareness of #VOTEWRIGHTNOW AT METS.COM.”

Cougars vs. Pandas? I get the angle.

While Wright is appreciative of the Mets’ efforts, he told Adam Rubin of ESPN New York after today’s loss that he has asked the team to scale back their promotional efforts for him, especially during games at Citi Field.

“You appreciate what they’re trying to do, and they’re very good-hearted. At the same time, this is a team game. As much as I’d like to be here to represent this team in the All-Star Game, we can’t let this become an in-between-inning, one-player production. Especially with the way we’re playing as a team, I feel very uncomfortable being singled out for All-Star-Game-type stuff.”

As for being named “Hottest Cub,” Wright said, “I guess I’d like to thanks my parents for the genes.” It’s ultimately a little embarrassing for all involved, but at least Wright has a sense of humor about the whole thing.

The Cubs played under protest after Joe Maddon disputed an ‘illegal’ pitching motion

Joe Maddon
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The Cubs found themselves in a disadvantageous position toward the end of their 5-2 loss to the Nationals on Saturday. Down by three in the ninth, they were finally looking to gain some ground against closer Sean Doolittle after wearying themselves against Stephen Strasburg for the first eight innings of the game. Instead, the game ended under protest when Cubs skipper Joe Maddon took umbrage with Doolittle’s delivery:

The issue appeared to stem from the motion Doolittle made with his left foot, a kind of “toe-tapping” gesture that Maddon believed had previously been made illegal. The official rules state that a pitcher may not take a second step toward home plate during his delivery, a stipulation that had previously been violated by Cubs’ pitcher Carl Edwards Jr.:

Comparing the two motions, however, one would be hard-pressed to characterize Doolittle’s tapping motion as a full step toward the plate. Maddon clearly didn’t see it that way, and emerged from the dugout to dispute the pitcher’s delivery twice. Following Doolittle’s first-pitch strike to Albert Almora, the manager informed home-plate umpire Sam Holbrook that the Cubs would play the remainder of the game under protest.

An official decision has not yet been announced regarding the illegality of the delivery and the validity of the Cubs’ protest. According to league rules, “the game will not be replayed unless it is also determined that the violation adversely affected the protesting team’s chances of winning.”

During the inning in question, however, the umpiring crew allowed Doolittle to continue his delivery. He helped secure the Nationals’ 5-2 win after inducing a groundout from Almora, striking out Kyle Schwarber, and getting a game-ending pop-out from Kris Bryant.

After the game, both Holbrook and Doolittle took issue with Maddon’s protest.

“In that moment, he’s not trying to do anything other than rattle me,” Doolittle told reporters. “And it was kind of tired. I don’t know, sometimes he has to remind people how smart he is and how much he pays attention to the game. So he put his stamp on it, for sure.”

Holbrook, meanwhile, said Doolittle did “absolutely nothing illegal at all.”