MLB’s civil case against Biogenesis and others is still proceeding. One of the others is interesting.

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Part of MLB’s deal with Anthony Bosch is that the league will dismiss the lawsuit it filed against him. It hasn’t done that yet. Which isn’t terribly surprising as MLB is still probably wanting to ensure continued cooperation from him and to ensure that they get something of value from him. The court likely won’t make the league do anything until various deadlines approach that require its attention.

But there are other defendants besides Bosch. One of them is his former colleague who is alleged by MLB to have also given players PEDs. His name is Carlos Acevedo and just this afternoon his latest request to have the lawsuit against him dismissed was denied, so he’s still in MLB’s crosshairs.

Acevedo is an interesting character here. I presume his defense — in addition to some statute of limitations grounds mentioned in the linked article — will be that he had nothing to do with Biogenesis. Which may be technically true. However, Acevedo and Bosch were partners in a predecessor anti-aging clinic before they had a falling out and went their separate ways. And it wasn’t too terribly long ago that this happened. The third partner in that clinic, a guy named Xavier Romero, left with Acevedo. He told the New York Times a couple of months ago that (a) he didn’t do anything with athletes; and (b) Bosch was a wreck and that he was surprised that he’d be able to lure baseball players as clients. The article also noted that Acevedo had a good reputation in the anti-aging community and worked with solid medical companies in the past.

Which makes me wonder about Major League Baseball’s interest in Acevedo. Do they think that he was a source of PEDs to players? If so, you’d think he’d be a better target for cooperation than Bosch, given his apparently more august standing in the world, his greater ability (in Romano’s view, one presumes) to lure high profile clients; and, by extension, his fewer credibility problems. On the other hand, if they don’t think he was involved, this lawsuit, with respect to Acevedo anyway, stinks to high heavens.

While I disagreed with Major League Baseball’s lawsuit when it was filed and still believe it’s the weakest legal sauce imaginable, I don’t think MLB is in the business of harassing truly innocent parties, which is what they’d be doing here if Acevedo didn’t have some sort of involvement in providing drugs to players. Which makes me think that maybe they’re trying to do with Acevedo what they did with Bosch: flip him and get him to talk about players’ drug use. Which suggests that either MLB doesn’t think that it yet has the goods or that it’s being extremely deliberate as it builds its case.

If they do have the goods on the players, though, you’d think they’d quit pursuing Acevedo, right?

Gallegos agrees to 2-year, $11M contract with Cardinals

Atlanta Braves v St. Louis Cardinals
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ST. LOUIS – Reliever Giovanny Gallegos and the St. Louis Cardinals agreed to a two-year, $11 million contract, a deal that includes a club option for 2025 and escalators that could make it worth $20.5 million over three seasons.

The 31-year-old right-hander is 3-5 with a 2.91 ERA and 14 saves in 20 chances this season. He has 72 strikeouts and 15 walks in 58 2/3 innings.

“I feel so happy,” Gallegos said before the Cardinals played the Pirates in Pittsburgh. “I don’t have the word for exactly how I’m feeling.”

He was obtained from the Yankees in July 2018 along with left-hander Chasen Shreve in the trade that sent first baseman Luke Voit to New York. Gallegos is 14-15 with a 3.02 ERA and 34 saves in six major league seasons.

Gallegos gets a $500,000 signing bonus and salaries of $4.5 million next year and $5.5 million in 2024. St. Louis has a $6.5 million team option for 2025 with a $500,000 buyout.

His 2025 option price can increase by up to $3.5 million for games finished in 2024: $500,000 each for 20-25 and 26-30 and 31-35, and $1 million apiece for 36-40 and 41 or more.

He would get $250,000 for winning the Rivera/Hoffman reliever of the year award, $50,000 for All-Star selection and World Series MVP and $25,000 for League Championship Series MVP.

Gallegos has a $2.41 million salary this year.

He was eligible for salary arbitration and is potentially eligible for free agency after the 2024 season.