Motivated by failure against Marlins, Mets make sweeping changes

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The Mets were swept by the Marlins for the second consecutive weekend, and endured consecutive extra-inning losses as they fell 8-4 in ten innings this afternoon after losing 2-1 in 20 innings yeterday. Manager Terry Collins watched as his bullpen surrendered a 4-3 lead and put the game out of reach after imploding in the tenth. His team made a comedy of errors, both scoring-wise and otherwise, prompting this response to the media after the game:

GM Sandy Alderson didn’t waste time acting, choosing to demote Ike Davis, Robert Carson, and Mike Baxter to Triple-A Las Vegas, reports ESPN’s Adam Rubin. Rubin says the players coming from Triple-A to the big leagues will be known later, as Las Vegas is currently in a game.

Update (7:50 PM): Rubin on Twitter:

Davis, who went 0-for-3 this afternoon, is now hitting .161. Carson, charged with one run in his one inning of work today, has an 8.50 ERA. And Baxter, who went 0-for-4 today, is hitting .212.

The Mets have lost five consecutive games to the lowly Marlins. The Marlins, now 18-44, are 8-3 against the Mets (.727) and 10-41 (.196) against everyone else.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: