Tim Lincecum “open to changes”, including a future as a reliever

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In an exclusive with CSN Bay Area’s Andrew Baggarly, Giants starter Tim Lincecum says that although he is presently committed to starting so long as his team needs him — and with an injured Ryan Vogelsong and struggling Matt Cain, they do — he is open to converting fully as a reliever in the future. Lincecum currently has a 5.12 ERA in 11 starts, continuing the struggles that led to a 5.18 ERA over 33 starts last year. The Giants used him out of the bullpen in five of his six post-season appearances, however, and the right-hander allowed one run in 13 innings.

Lincecum spoke to the differences between starting and relieving:

“Out of the bullpen, your focus is different,” Lincecum said. “You’re not thinking about lasting. It’s, `Go until they tell you to stop.’ When you’re starting, when you see your pitch count go up in a bad inning, that can be at the forefront of your brain. You know it’s going to (limit how deep you can go). So I guess you could say it’s a lack of pressing, when you’re relieving.”

Lincecum is eligible for free agency after the season. Considering his recent adversity as a starter, you have to imagine potential suitors are viewing him more as a reliever than as a starter if they are even considering signing him at all.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.