Great Moments in “if The Boss was alive”

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As we’ve noted several times in the past, the easiest column a New York writer has is the “if The Boss was alive …” column. You lose your press pass, I assume, if you don’t crank out a couple of these a year. Ian O’Connor works to fill his quota today at ESPN New York:

Brian Cashman was on his way home from a four-game, two-stadium, one-city sweep suffered at the hands of the New York Mets when he fielded a question that summoned a bad memory from the not-too-distant past.

What would George Steinbrenner have said to you tonight?

Cashman paused over the phone as he measured the chilling thought. An inquiring mind thought the call had dropped before the general manager of the second-best team in New York this week finally broke the silence.

“I can’t even imagine,” he said.

It’s also possible that Cashman considered the thought far more silly than chilling, what with the fact that Steinbrenner has been dead for three years and hadn’t been actively running the team for several years before that. AND that The Boss that these columnists constantly invoke — the angry, fire-first, ask-questions-later Steinbrenner — more or less ceased to exist in the early 90s when he came back from his suspension. The latter-era Boss would bark a lot, but he also let Gene Michael and Brian Cashman run the teams most of the time.

Asking “What Would The Boss Do” may be a fun game for writers who wished they had the kind of drama now that they had back in the 70s and 80s, but it’s almost completely irrelevant to the state of the New York Yankees in 2013. And explaining the state of the New York Yankees in 2013 is sorta their job.

Brewers have 3 positive COVID tests at alternate site

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
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MILWAUKEE — The Brewers had two players and a staff member test positive for the coronavirus at their alternate training site in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed the positive results Saturday and said they shouldn’t impact the major league team. Teams are using alternate training sites this season to keep reserve players sharp because the minor league season was canceled due to the pandemic.

Stearns said the positive tests came Monday and did not name the two players or the staff member. Players must give their permission for their names to be revealed after positive tests.

The entire camp was placed in quarantine.

“We have gone through contact tracing,” Stearns said. “We do not believe it will have any impact at all on our major league team. We’ve been fortunate to get through this season relatively unscathed in this area. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get all the way there at our alternate site.”

Milwaukee entered Saturday one game behind the Reds and Cardinals for second place in the NL Central, with the top two teams qualifying for the postseason.

The Brewers still will be able to take taxi squad players with them on the team’s trip to Cincinnati and St. Louis in the final week of the season. He said those players have had repeated negative tests and the team is “confident” there would be no possible spread of the virus.

“Because of the nature of who these individuals were, it’s really not going to affect the quarantine group at all,” Stearns said. “We’re very fortunate that the group of players who could potentially be on a postseason roster for us aren’t interacting all that much with the individuals that tested positive.”