“Why don’t you think there are more major leaguers with red hair?”

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Earlier today, just before taping HBT Daily, Kay Adams and I were talking about redheads. You’ll have to ask her why the subject came up in the first place but know that it involved a bet, a wig and a lot of come-ons. I’m awfully glad I’m a dude.

Anyway, we discussed that thing about how, biologically speaking, redheads are selected against. Which was a hoax, by the way, but it’s the sort of thing that rattles around in one’s brain after one hears it. I mean, the thing about gingers having no soul is scientifically proven, so I sort of assumed the thing about them being selected against was too.

Anyway, maybe there is one place they really are selected against: the baseball diamond. At least that’s what Astros GM Jeff Luhnow wondered aloud to Jerry Crasnick of ESPN.com, who investigated the matter.

Crasnick’s conclusions: there aren’t a lot of redheads in the world to begin with so there aren’t likely to be as many readheaded ballplayers. That said, there are a lot of notable redheaded ballplayers, and Crasnick names a great many of them. And either way, there are still some weird old scouts in baseball and in football who have a prejudice against redheads because, man, I have no idea but that’s pretty dumb.

At least we can all agree on the no-souls thing, yes?

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.