Apparently Miguel Cabrera’s 2013 has made his 2012 better somehow

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Bill posted about Cabrera’s big night last night, and this morning Twitter is dominated by folks noting just how utterly ridiculous Cabrera has been so far this year. And make no mistake, he has been. He’s hitting .387/.457/.659 and leads the AL in runs, hits, RBI, batting average, on-base percentage, OPS, and total bases. Just crazy dominant. Obviously the pace won’t continue, but he’s easily the current leader in the MVP race if you care about such things in May.

But there is one tiny — and believe me, it is tiny — thing bothering me about all this today. It’s this sentiment, which I’ve seen all over the Twitters since the season began, usually spiking after Cabrera has a big game:

Do these people seriously believe that what happens in 2013 justifies assessments made about the 2012 season? How far back does this line of thinking go? Prince Fielder is having a better year than Albert Pujols, Hanley Ramirez and Ryan Howard. Does that mean he should have finished ahead of them in the 2009 MVP voting? Can someone tell me how this works?

People like to say the statheads are on some crusade and can’t stand it if people don’t agree with them. But I don’t see any statheads still fighting the 2012 MVP debates. And none of them are seriously arguing that Trout has had a better year than Cabrera so far.

Orioles’ pitching crosses 100 homers allowed mark in 48th game

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The Orioles’ pitching staff is on pace to obliterate the Reds’ record of 258 homers allowed in the season. When O’s starter David Hess yielded a three-run home run to Yankees outfielder Clint Frazier in the fifth inning of Tuesday night’s game, that marked the 100th homer given up by a Baltimore pitcher this season. They have played 48 games so far, putting them on pace to allow 338.

The homer was Frazier’s second of the night. He had also gone yard with a runner on in the third inning. Gary Sánchez opened the scoring in the first inning with a three-run blast of his own. As of this writing, the Yankees are leading 11-3.

Not that it comes as any surprise, but the Yankees’ offense has the Orioles’ number so far this season. The club has hit 73 homers on the season with 26 of them — 36 percent — coming against the Orioles. The Yankees have played 10 of their 47 games — 21 percent — against the O’s. The Orioles have also allowed 23 home runs to the Twins in six games so far this season