Apparently Miguel Cabrera’s 2013 has made his 2012 better somehow

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Bill posted about Cabrera’s big night last night, and this morning Twitter is dominated by folks noting just how utterly ridiculous Cabrera has been so far this year. And make no mistake, he has been. He’s hitting .387/.457/.659 and leads the AL in runs, hits, RBI, batting average, on-base percentage, OPS, and total bases. Just crazy dominant. Obviously the pace won’t continue, but he’s easily the current leader in the MVP race if you care about such things in May.

But there is one tiny — and believe me, it is tiny — thing bothering me about all this today. It’s this sentiment, which I’ve seen all over the Twitters since the season began, usually spiking after Cabrera has a big game:

Do these people seriously believe that what happens in 2013 justifies assessments made about the 2012 season? How far back does this line of thinking go? Prince Fielder is having a better year than Albert Pujols, Hanley Ramirez and Ryan Howard. Does that mean he should have finished ahead of them in the 2009 MVP voting? Can someone tell me how this works?

People like to say the statheads are on some crusade and can’t stand it if people don’t agree with them. But I don’t see any statheads still fighting the 2012 MVP debates. And none of them are seriously arguing that Trout has had a better year than Cabrera so far.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.