Miguel Cabrera ties Hank Greenberg with 331st career homer

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With a three-run home run to right-center in the third inning and a solo shot to straightaway center in the fifth — his ninth and tenth of the season, respectively — against Rangers starter Derek Holland, Miguel Cabrera put himself in a tie with Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg with 331 career home runs.

Cabrera, the defending AL MVP and the first player in 45 years to win a Triple Crown, bumped his league-leading average up to .384 and league-leading RBI total to 46, putting himself in prime position to win another Triple Crown. You know, if he feels like it. Only two players have won multiple Triple Crowns: Rogers Hornsby in 1922 and ’25, and Ted Williams in 1942 and ’47.

Cabrera is one of 15 players all-time to have 330 or more career home runs before his 31st birthday. Assuming he hits at least another 30, he’ll move up to #12 on the list at least.

The list (as of this writing):

Rk Player HR From To Age PA
1 Alex Rodriguez 464 1994 2006 18-30 7774
2 Ken Griffey 438 1989 2000 19-30 7319
3 Jimmie Foxx 429 1925 1938 17-30 7293
4 Albert Pujols 408 2001 2010 21-30 6782
5 Mickey Mantle 404 1951 1962 19-30 7199
6 Eddie Mathews 399 1952 1962 20-30 7124
7 Frank Robinson 373 1956 1966 20-30 7088
8 Mel Ott 369 1926 1939 17-30 7808
9 Andruw Jones 368 1996 2007 19-30 7276
10 Hank Aaron 366 1954 1964 20-30 7216
11 Juan Gonzalez 362 1989 2000 19-30 5779
12 Adam Dunn 354 2001 2010 21-30 6065
13 Sammy Sosa 336 1989 1999 20-30 5808
14 Harmon Killebrew 336 1954 1966 18-30 5202
15 Miguel Cabrera 331 2003 2013 20-30 6669
16 Ralph Kiner 329 1946 1953 23-30 5223
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 5/19/2013.

Update (11:35 PM): Miguel Cabrera hit his third home run of the night, a solo shot to center off of Tanner Scheppers. So he’s up to 332.

Mike Leake loses perfect game bid on leadoff single in the ninth

Mike Leake
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Just one week after Taylor Cole and Felix Peña tossed a combined no-hitter against Seattle, Mariners right-hander Mike Leake worked on his own perfect game through eight innings against the Angels.

It was an ambitious form of revenge, and one that Leake served up perfectly as he held the Angels scoreless in frame after frame. He sprinkled a handful of strikeouts throughout the first eight innings, catching Matt Thaiss on a called strike three in the third and getting two whiffs — called strikeouts against both Brian Goodwin and Shohei Ohtani — in the fourth.

The Mariners, meanwhile, put up a good fight against the Angels, backing Leake’s attempt with 10 runs — their first double-digit total since a 13-3 rout of the Orioles on June 23. Daniel Vogelbach led things off in the fourth with a three-run homer off of reliever Jaime Barria, then repeated the feat with another three-run shot off Barria in the fifth. Tom Murphy and J.P. Crawford helped pad the lead as well with a two-RBI single and two-RBI double, respectively.

In the ninth, with just three outs remaining, the Angels finally managed to break through. Luis Rengifo worked a 1-1 count against Leake, then returned an 85.3-m.p.h. changeup to right field for a base hit, dismantling the perfecto and the no-hitter in one fell swoop. Leake lost control of the ball following the hit, issuing four straight balls to Kevan Smith in the next at-bat and giving the Angels their first runner in scoring position. Still at a pitch count of just 90, however, he induced the next two outs in quick fashion and polished off the win with a triumphant eight-pitch strikeout against Mike Trout for the first one-hitter (and Maddux) of his career.

Had Leake successfully closed out the perfecto, it would’ve been the first of his decade-long career in the majors and the first the Mariners had seen since Félix Hernández’s perfect game against the Rays in August 2012. For their part, the Angels have yet to be on the losing end of a perfecto. The last time they were shut out in a no-hitter was 1999, at the hands of then-Twins pitcher Eric Milton.