Troy Tulowitzki says he wasn’t accusing Madison Bumgarner of cheating

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In a season that has already endured the drama of one cheating allegation, another was set to boil last night when Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki asked umpire Tim McClelland to inspect the baseball Giants starter Madison Bumgarner was gripping. McClelland gave it a once-over, then tossed the ball out of play. Bumgarner said something to Tulowitzki — exactly what, we don’t know — ostensibly voicing his displeasure at having his credibility called into question.

Tulowitzki clarified his intentions to the media. CSN Bay Area’s Andrew Baggarly with the quotes:

“I wasn’t accusing him at all,” Tulowitzki said. “I have too much respect for him to do something like that. I didn’t think they were cheating.”

[…]

“You respect the game and there’s something on the baseball, so let’s get rid of it and move on,” Tulowitzki said. “You respect guys who compete. I have respect for him and hopefully he has the same for me.”

If Bumgarner was doctoring baseballs, it sure didn’t help. The lefty finished the night having allowed nine runs (seven earned) in four and two-thirds innings of work. A Jordan Pacheco grand slam ended his evening. Still, the Giants made a game of it, scoring three runs in the seventh and one run in the eighth in an eventual 10-9 loss.

Brian Anderson suffers hand fracture on a hit-by-pitch

Brian Anderson
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Marlins infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson departed Friday’s 19-11 win over the Phillies with a left hand contusion, the club announced. Following an X-ray, it was then revealed that he had sustained a fracture of the fifth metacarpal — an injury severe enough that it’ll likely keep him off the field for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Anderson suffered the injury on a hit-by-pitch in the third inning. On the first pitch of the at-bat, with the bases loaded and one out, he took a 93.9-m.p.h. fastball off his left hand. The HBP forced in a run, but he doubled over in pain and was quickly examined by a member of the Marlins’ staff before officially departing the game in the top of the fourth.

It’s an unfortunate way to end Anderson’s third campaign with the Marlins. The 26-year-old has posted some career-high numbers this year, reaching the 20-homer mark for the first time and batting a healthy .261/.342/.468 with an .810 OPS and 3.0 fWAR through 510 PA. Despite the setback, he should be fully healed and ready to go well in advance of the Marlins’ spring training in 2020.