Robinson Cano homers twice in win over Blue Jays

35 Comments

Robinson Cano homered twice while David Phelps had the longest outing of his career as the Yankees topped the Blue Jays 7-2 this afternoon at Yankee Stadium.

Brandon Morrow, who was recently skipped twice in Toronto’s rotation due to neck and back tightness, gave up five runs in five innings in the loss. Cano did most of the damage, as he connected for a two-run home run in the three-run third inning and another two-run blast in the fifth inning. He’s now tied with the Indians’ Mark Reynolds for the American League lead with 12 home runs.

Phelps tossed seven innings of one-run ball in the victory. The 26-year-old right-hander allowed six hits and three walks while striking out eight and now owns a 3.83 ERA on the year. As Zachary Levine of Baseball Prospectus notes, he quietly has 142 strikeouts over 142 innings in the major leagues.

Travis Hafner was back in action this afternoon after missing four games due to shoulder tendinitis and launched a two-run homer in the eighth inning. The 35-year-old has seven home runs in 33 games this season, including five in 54 at-bats at Yankee Stadium.

After winning four straight, the Blue Jays have dropped back-to-back games to fall to 17-26 on the season. The Yankees will have CC Sabathia on the hill tomorrow as they go for the sweep while Toronto will counter with R.A. Dickey.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

Getty Images
1 Comment

Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.