David Ortiz hits two homers, drives in six as Red Sox drub the Twins

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Even at the age of 37 and less than a year separated from an Achilles injury, David Ortiz can still hit with the best of them. The slugger entered tonight’s game against the Twins with a .999 OPS, including five home runs and 23 RBI in 98 trips to the plate. Since joining the club on April 20 after a stint on the 15-day DL, Ortiz has been his team’s best and most consistent source of offense, which is saying a lot considering their options — Dustin Pedroia, for instance, has a .438 on-base percentage.

Ortiz hit two more home runs tonight: a three-run shot against Twins starter Scott Diamond in the first inning, and a two-run shot against reliever Anthony Swarzak in the seventh. He finished the night with three hits, a walk, and six RBI as the Red Sox won 12-5. Pedro Ciriaco was the only member of the lineup not to log a hit. At the time of Ortiz’s homer in the seventh, the Sox were clutching tightly their 7-5 lead, but were finally allowed to breathe a sigh of relief with the added insurance provided by the tenured slugger.

Recently in the news for the wrong reasons thanks to Dan Shaughnessy, you have to imagine his recent offensive tear — he went 3-for-5 yesterday — tastes extra sweet.

Jean Segura hits a three-run homer to put the AL up 5-2 in the eighth

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As we moved to the top of the eighth inning things started to loosen up. Which was good for the American League but not for the Senior Circuit.

Josh Hader of the Brewers was pitching and, in very un-2018-style, the American League strung together a couple of hits, with Shin-Soo Choo and George Springer singling. At that point Jen Segura of the Mariners came to the plate while Joe Buck spoke to National League outfielder Charlie Blackmon on the mic. Blackmon was entertaining until Joey Votto failed to corral a would-be foul out from Segura, at which point he tensed up a bit. Then Segura launched a massive three-run homer to left. Blackmon called Buck “bad luck,” Mitch Moreland singled and Blackmon said that if the next pitch wasn’t a double play ball, he was bailing on the broadcast.

With the Americans leading 5-2, Dave Roberts made a pitching change, bringing in Brad Hand with one out in the inning. Buck bid adieu to Blackmon, for which Blackmon seemed thankful. These mic’d up players are fun, but there’s a limit to how much distraction they’ll endure, even in a meaningless exhibition game.

Hand struck out Michael Brantley and then