Bryce Harper leaves game after crashing face-first into right field wall

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UPDATE: Per Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post, Harper’s agent, Scott Boras, said that his client received 11 stitches but did not suffer a concussion. He also jammed his shoulder and will sent for an X-ray. It’s not clear when he’ll play next, but it sounds like relatively good news under the circumstances. We should know more during the day on Tuesday.

12:10 AM: Bryce Harper left tonight’s game against the Dodgers in the bottom of the fifth inning after he crashed face-first into the right field wall at Dodger Stadium.

Harper suffered the injury when he was chasing after a ball off the bat of A.J. Ellis. He appeared to lose track of where he was before he ran into the fence at full-speed. The particular area he crashed into is not padded, so it made for a pretty scary impact.

Harper was on the ground for a couple of moments before he got to his feet and walked off the field under his own power, but he appeared dazed and had a cut on his chin and/or neck. The Nationals will undoubtedly send him for tests for a possible concussion.

You can watch video of the play below:

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.