Brian Roberts will have hamstring surgery on Thursday

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Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts underwent surgery last August to repair a torn labrum in his hip. He then had surgery in December for a sports hernia. And now he is going under the knife yet again.

According to MASN’s Roch Kubatko, Roberts is scheduled to have surgery Thursday at the Carrell Clinic in Dallas to fix a ruptured tendon his right hamstring, near the knee. He suffered the injury in early April and tried rehabbing it first to no avail.

Roberts is expected to need around six weeks of recovery time. The Orioles will likely shift him from the 15-day disabled list to the 60-day disabled list at some point soon.

Ryan Flaherty and Alexi Casillia will continue to share time at second base for Baltimore.

Roberts has appeared in only 118 games since the start of the 2010 season while earning $40 million.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.