Roy Halladay is not happy with Mitch Williams

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Since Roy Halladay started the 2012 season off with a whimper, he has heard theories on quick fixes from all corners of the globe. Bloggers (present company included), talk radio hosts, Internet commenters, and TV pundits have all speculated as to what went wrong with the two-time Cy Young award winner and how he can fix it.

MLB Network’s Mitch Williams has been among the more vocal critics of pitching coach Rich Dubee. Williams, who made a name for himself with uncanny mechanics as the Phillies’ closer between 1991-93, suggested Dubee should have seen Halladay’s mechanical flaws and that the Phillies ought to find a new pitching coach when he appeared on 94.1 WIP this morning, according to Todd Zolecki. When asked by the media to comment, Roy Halladay — normally reserved and succinct — had a lot to say about Williams.

“Coming from the mechanical wonder,” Halladay said. “Yeah, I strong disagree. To come from a guy who’s not around, who’s not involved. He’s not involved in the conversations … honestly has no idea what’s going on. He really doesn’t. He has no idea what’s going on in the clubhouse, on the field between coaches and players. To make comments like that, it’s completely out of line. It really is. Rich Dubee, when I first came over, he taught me a change up. If I hadn’t had that coming over here I wouldn’t have had the success I’ve had over here. Especially dealing with the injuries I’ve dealt with, if I didn’t have that pitch, if I didn’t have him working with me, I really would have been in a lot of trouble. In my opinion, it’s a statement that I feel like he needs to make amends for. I really do. There’s very few pitching coaches that I respect more than Rich Dubee.”

There’s a lot more if you head over to Zolecki’s post on MLB.com. Among other highlights, Halladay calls Williams “arrogant”. Dubee, who had gotten upset with Williams for interfering with his pitchers during spring training, suggests “maybe I hurt his feelings”.

This isn’t the first time Dubee has snapped at the media for wondering about Halladay. On April 21, he refused to speak to the media about Halladay’s improvement, telling them to “let Roy be Roy”.

Halladay’s 2013 season has been a mixed bag. In his first two starts, he allowed 12 runs in 7.1 innings. In his next three, he allowed four runs in 21 innings. In his latest start, he surrendered eight runs to the Indians in 3.2 innings.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.