Despite all the cost-cutting, the Yankees are likely to exceed the luxury tax threshold next year

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Oops.

Jeff Passan reports why the Yankees — whose decision to not sign any significant long-term deals this past offseason despite multiple on-field needs was chalked up to a desire to get under next-year’s $189 million luxury tax threshold — are likely to exceed said threshold nonetheless:

In recent months, the Yankees have become far less bullish on their publicly stated austerity plan, admitting to other executives and agents that staying beneath the $189 million threshold is unlikely and impractical.

“They’re going to be over 189,” one source familiar with the Yankees’ plans said. “They know it. Everyone knows it. You can’t run a $3 billion team with the intentions of saving a few million dollars.”

Passan explains why the particular rules of the luxury tax and the revenue sharing system make Plan-$189 million both impractical and, perhaps, less desirable to the Yankees than it once was.

Now, if only there were some good young blue chip free agents to go blow a chunk of change on.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.