Rick Camp: 1953-2013

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Rick Camp, who provided swingman duties for the Braves from 1976-1985 died today. He was 59. Camp had a career record of 56-49 with an above average ERA of 3.37. Not bad considering his strikeout rates were always low.

Camp is remembered for two things, primarily. The first one being his 2005 criminal conviction for attempting to defraud a mental institution. Which, hey, he did the time so let’s let that slide now that he is warming up in the Great Bullpen in the Sky.

The second was way better: On July 4, 1985 Camp, an awful hitter, even by pitcher standards, hit a game-tying home run in the 18th inning of a rain-delayed game against the Mets. Unfortunately the game went 19 innings, Camp coughed up five runs in the top of the final frame and got the loss. The game ended at 4AM. But even though he lost, man, that’s a humdinger of a game, ain’t it?

Here are highlights from that game. And get this: John Sterling called the homer right before he hit it, more or less.

RIP, Rick.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.