Florida legislature to spend $3.3 million a year to try to keep spring training in Florida

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In Florida, the spring training parks are spread out from one another, making travel a drag. The Florida legislature passed a budget yesterday which provides $3.3 million a year for spring training complex upgrades and construction. Including:

This incentive is aimed at helping pay for a proposed stadium that would be used by the Houston Astros and the Toronto Blue Jays in Palm Beach Gardens. The Astros currently train in Kissimmee while the Blue Jays train in Dunedin.

Houston is interesting. Moving from the NL Central to the AL West means that all of their division rivals train in Arizona now. You have to wonder if they wouldn’t want to eventually move to the Cactus League in order to take advantage of all the people who travel to see Texas, Anaheim, Oakland and Seattle.

The Jays have been in Dunedin since the beginning and Canada-to-Florida tourism is a pretty major thing. One wonders if they’d actually try to leave the state, incentives or no incentives. Right now Cleveland and Cincinnati are the farthest north/east teams which travel to Arizona each winter and they’ve historically been at the bottom of Cactus League attendance.

(thanks to Nathan R. for the heads up)

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.