Brett Myers isn’t feeling 100 percent

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Brett Myers gave up two homers in five innings yesterday in a 3-2 loss to the Astros. He has now served up 10 long balls in 21 1/3 innings over his first four starts this season and currently holds a league-worst 8.02 ERA. While he has always been prone to the gopher ball, it appears there’s a reason for his early struggles.

According to Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Myers said after last night’s game that he has has dealt with soreness in the flexor tendon muscle in his right forearm since spring training. He was visited by manager Terry Francona, pitching coach Mickey Callaway and head athletic trainer Lonnie Soloff during the fifth inning last night, but was able to finish the frame.

“My velocity dropped, and I’m not sure why,” said Myers. “It just happened. They came out to see if I was all right.”

Myers averaged 91.6 mph on his fastball as a reliever with the Astros and White Sox, but it has dropped down to 88.4 mph with his move back to the rotation this year. It’s worth noting that he had the same average velocity during his last stint as a starter in 2011 when he posted a 4.46 ERA over 216 innings. Still, if his struggles continue, he could have a stint on the disabled list in his future.

Myers joined the Indians over the winter on a one-year, $7 million deal with an $8 million club option for 2014. The option becomes guaranteed if he throws 200 innings and passes a physical after the season.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.