Brett Myers isn’t feeling 100 percent

3 Comments

Brett Myers gave up two homers in five innings yesterday in a 3-2 loss to the Astros. He has now served up 10 long balls in 21 1/3 innings over his first four starts this season and currently holds a league-worst 8.02 ERA. While he has always been prone to the gopher ball, it appears there’s a reason for his early struggles.

According to Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Myers said after last night’s game that he has has dealt with soreness in the flexor tendon muscle in his right forearm since spring training. He was visited by manager Terry Francona, pitching coach Mickey Callaway and head athletic trainer Lonnie Soloff during the fifth inning last night, but was able to finish the frame.

“My velocity dropped, and I’m not sure why,” said Myers. “It just happened. They came out to see if I was all right.”

Myers averaged 91.6 mph on his fastball as a reliever with the Astros and White Sox, but it has dropped down to 88.4 mph with his move back to the rotation this year. It’s worth noting that he had the same average velocity during his last stint as a starter in 2011 when he posted a 4.46 ERA over 216 innings. Still, if his struggles continue, he could have a stint on the disabled list in his future.

Myers joined the Indians over the winter on a one-year, $7 million deal with an $8 million club option for 2014. The option becomes guaranteed if he throws 200 innings and passes a physical after the season.

Hunter Pence is mashing for the Rangers

Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
3 Comments

Hunter Pence was thought to be on his way to retirement after a lackluster 2018 season with the Giants. As he entered his mid-30’s, Pence spent a considerable amount of time on the injured list, playing in 389 out of 648 possible regular season games with the Giants from 2015-18.

Pence, however, kept his career going, inking a minor league deal with the Rangers in February. He performed very well in spring training, earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Pence hasn’t stopped hitting.

Entering Monday night’s game against the Mariners, Pence was batting .299/.358/.619 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 109 plate appearances, mostly as a DH. Statcast agrees that Pence has been mashing the ball. He has an average exit velocity of 93.3 MPH this season, which would obliterate his marks in each of the previous four seasons since Statcast became a thing. His career average exit velocity is 89.8 MPH. He has “barreled” the ball 10.4 percent of the time, well above his 6.2 percent average.

What Pence did to a baseball in the seventh inning of Monday’s game, then, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

That’s No. 9 on the year for Pence. Statcast measured it at 449 feet and 108.3 MPH off the bat. Not only is Pence not retired, he may be a lucrative trade chip for the Rangers leading up to the trade deadline at the end of July.