The Yankees and StubHub about to settle their lawsuit

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The Yankees sued StubHub in March, alleging that StubHub’s opening of a ticket office within 1,500 feet of Yankee Stadium violated New York laws against scalping. StubHub’s argument was that it wasn’t a ticket sales office but, rather, merely a printing station for tickets purchased online at home.  The Yankees obtained a temporary restraining order to keep StubHub from opening its office.

Now the lawsuit seems to be on the verge of settling:

 

The terms of the settlement are unknown and will likely remain private. I suppose we’ll be able to infer something based on whether that StubHub office ever opens for business. If it does, on site, figure they paid the Yankees a decent amount of money to do it. If they open up more than 1,500 feet away from the Stadium, it may be safe to assume that the Yankees helped pay some relocation costs or something.

Either way, I get the vibe that everyone felt that the Yankees had a pretty righteous case and that it would be a hard sell for StubHub to convince a court that a “printing office” wasn’t really in the business of selling tickets in violation of that 1,500 foot law.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.