Ranking my 10 favorite baseball movies of all time

123 Comments

OK, so yesterday I linked to IMDB’s list of the top 10 baseball movies of all time and suggested that any list ranking “Fever Pitch” ahead of “The Natural” while leaving “Major League” off entirely is sort of tough to take seriously.

Of course, it’s a lot easier to pick on another person’s list than it is to come up with your own list, or at least to come up with your own list and publish it on the internet so other people can pick on it.

With the trio of disclaimers that I haven’t seen some prominent baseball movies since I was a kid, did not include/consider documentaries, and put approximately 20 minutes of thought into compiling this entire thing, here’s my top 10:

1. “Bull Durham”
2. “Major League”
3. “The Bad News Bears”
4. “The Sandlot”
5. “A League Of Their Own”
6. “Eight Men Out”
7. “The Natural”
8. “Field Of Dreams”
9. “Moneyball”
10*. “Mr. Baseball”/”Rookie Of The Year”/”Little Big League”

* Yeah, that’s technically 12 movies. Whatever. As always, complaints can be lodged via Twitter.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

Getty Images
3 Comments

Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.